Armando Galarraga designated for assignment

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It’s been a weird year for Armando Galarraga. The near-perfect game. Being turned into an unexpected role model for forgiveness. Being sent down to Toledo for eight games.  Looking like the odd man out in the rotation this winter. Unexpectedly reaching a deal avoiding arbitration late yesterday. And then this today:

One day after agreeing to terms with him on a $2.3MM contract for 2011, the Tigers have designated Armando Galarraga for assignment. The team announced the move on Twitter, while making its deal with Brad Penny official. Galarraga’s contract is non-guaranteed, though the Tigers would owe him termination pay if they were to release him.

Someone call Galarraga and make sure he hasn’t gone crazy yet. Someone call the Tigers and ask why they tendered him a contract to begin with.

Within ten minutes of this news hitting the wire my Yankees fan friends on Twitter began wondering whether Galarraga would make a good addition to the Bombers’ staff. My sense: meh. He’s more famous than he is good by virtue of the near-perfect game. If that hadn’t happened — against the punchless Indians, no less — he’d be unremarkable.  He lets a lot of men on base. He doesn’t strike out a ton of guys.  I think he may be more interesting than a bunch of Sergio Mitre starts, but it’s not like you’re getting some diamond in the rough by signing him.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.