Olney: Brian Cashman has “full confidence” of Steinbrenners

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If you ever had any doubt that the Yankees own New York, just look at the back page of the New York Daily News today.

Pretty impressive feat — no, I didn’t use that word because of Rex Ryan — especially on a weekend when the Jets are playing the Patriots in the divisional playoffs.

Anyway, Bill Madden and Roger Rubin wrote this morning that the Steinbrenners were “bothered by Cashman’s blueprint,” specifically that the club was going into the season with a thin starting rotation and little in the way of protection for closer Mariano Rivera. Cashman expressed confidence with in-house options Joba Chamberlain and David Robertson for the bullpen, but team brass ultimately decided that Rafael Soriano was an insurance policy that they couldn’t turn down.

Despite the difference of opinion, Buster Olney of ESPN.com hears that Cashman still has “full confidence” of the Steinbrenners. Jon Heyman of SI.com hears the same, adding that while Cashman preferred to keep the first-round draft pick, he “in no way threw a body block” to prevent the Soriano signing.

So, it sounds like Cashman was overruled in this instance. But is this really a big deal? And do we have any evidence that this hasn’t happened before? As much as we’d like to think that Cashman has been calling the shots personnel-wise, this is just a dose of reality that ownership has the final say, not just here, but pretty much everywhere.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.