Brian Cashman

Is the Soriano deal a sign of chaos in the Yankees organization?

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The Rafael Soriano deal was a shocker. Mostly because until very recently Brian Cashman was telling anyone who would listen that the Yankees were done with their days of giving multi-year deals to non-Mariano Rivera class relievers and that they were not going to give up the draft pick required to get Soriano because doing so directly benefits a division rival.

As a result of this. the big question as the deal went down last night was whether this was merely a change of course by Cashman or if he was overruled by his superiors.

Based on the reporting we’re seeing today, it was clearly the latter. Scott Boras got into the heads of Randy Levine or a random Steinbrenner and Cashman’s philosophy was set aside, at least in this instance.  Troubling? William J. over at TYU thinks so:

If true, that could be disastrous for the Yankees. Whether you like Cashman or not, the Yankees have seemed to benefit from having one coherent voice on baseball-related matters, so a return to the days of front office factions could have undesirable consequences.

I’m not so sure. Mostly because I don’t think any of us truly know how much input guys like Randy Levine and Hank Steinbrenner already have on personnel matters.  We have assumed that Cashman has been calling all of the shots in the past few years, but do we know that for sure? Each year the Yankees have a big organizational meeting right after the season ends. Who are we to say that Cashman’s priorities rule coming out of those meetings?

To be fair, as William J. notes, in this case the fact that there were reports of this being a front office move so quickly after it happened suggests that someone — maybe Cashman — was angry and was spreading the word that he was overruled.  But if others have serious input in setting the agenda in October, and if that agenda has been successful in recent years, who are we to say that they can’t change their minds about things in mid-stream?  It may be uncommon in recent years and it may be bad for office politics, but the point is that the right moves be made at the right time, isn’t it?

The Soriano signing is not a great move as we tend to understand them. It’s expensive. It’s very player-friendly.* But it is a move that makes the Yankees better in 2012.  And after a winter in which most of the Yankees’ original  objectives have not been met, any move that improves the team without sacrificing good prospects has to be considered a positive, does it not? The Yankees can afford to throw away some money. But they can’t afford to fall too far behind the Red Sox in the talent acquisition game.

Maybe Cashman was undermined. Maybe he wasn’t.  But I don’t think one transaction can tell us that for sure.  And even this was a case of Cashman being undermined, it may end up being  a situation in which it was a good thing for the sake of the team on the field.

*The most player-friendly aspect of this thing is that if Soriano performs well in 2011 and 2012, and if Mariano Rivera, as expected, retires after 2012, it’s a dead certainty that Soriano will use his opt-out provision to maximize his leverage against a desperate Yankees team.  One can never know what happens in negotiations, but I wonder if anyone tried to give Soriano an opt-out after 2011, but making it so that if he didn’t opt-out, 2013 became a team option.  Just spit-ballin’.

Report: Mariners have interest in Reds’ Jay Bruce

ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 14:  Jay Bruce #32 of the Cincinnati Reds waits to bat prior to hitting a three-run homer in the first inning against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on June 14, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that the Mariners are among the teams that have contacted the Reds about outfielder Jay Bruce. The Mariners enter play Wednesday 51-48, six games out of first place in the AL West and 4.5 games out of the second AL Wild Card slot. Adding an impact bat like Bruce could help in their effort to reach the postseason.

Norichika Aoki and Seth Smith have handled the bulk of the playing time in left field. While Smith has hit well, Aoki has not. Bruce came into Wednesday’s game against the Giants batting .271/.324/.567 with 24 home runs and a league-best 78 RBI.

Bruce can become a free agent after the season if his controlling team declines his $13 million club option for the 2017 season by paying him a $1 million buyout. If he’s traded mid-season, his new team won’t be able to make him a qualifying offer, so the club option may be more enticing than it looks at first glance.

The Padres have homered in 25 consecutive games, tying an NL record

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - JULY 16:  Adam Rosales #9 of the San Diego Padres hits an RBI single during the tenth inning of a baseball game against the San Francisco Giants at PETCO Park on July 16, 2016 in San Diego, California.   (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
Denis Poroy/Getty Images
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A third-inning two-run home run by Adam Rosales off of R.A. Dickey put the Padres up 2-0, but it also helped the Padres tie a National League record. The Padres have homered in 25 consecutive games, matching the 1998 Braves, the 1994 Tigers, and the 1941 Yankees. The major league record is 27, set by the 2002 Rangers.

The Padres hit three in total on Wednesday in an 8-4 victory against the Blue Jays. One of those dingers was an eighth-inning solo shot by rookie Alex Dickerson, who has now homered in four consecutive games himself. The one he hit on Monday is worth watching, as it got into the upper deck at the Rogers Centre.

As the Padres recently traded Melvin Upton, Jr. to the Jays, Dickerson is likely going to see regular playing time. That’s especially true if he keeps hitting like this.