Video: This wiffle ball king can sling it

4 Comments

I’m probably not alone in thinking that I had some pretty mean wiffle ball pitches back in my day.

My screwball caused hitters to tornado themselves into the ground, my knuckler put Bugs Bunny to shame, and my rising fastball not only came in deceptively hot, but was the one pitch I could put wherever I wanted to … usually.

Well it turns out I was probably more of a decent innings eater than a Cy Young candidate, sort of wiffle ball’s answer to Joe Blanton. My once rock-solid confidence in my abilities was shattered after watching the video above, which is perhaps the coolest pitching exhibition in the history of YouTube (with apologies to this guy)

Meet WiffleBoy28, and check out his nasty pitches on YouTube and on his web site, where he gives tips on how to pitch (and scuff!).

It would be wise to get to know this guy. I’m talking to you, Sandy Alderson. Think about Oliver Perez, and then ask yourself what you’ve got to lose.

— Hat tip to Ted Berg for the find.

You can follow Bob on Twitter, and get all your HBT updates here.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.