Frank McCourt met with executives from the commissioner’s office this week

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According to Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times, Dodgers owner Frank McCourt met with executives from the commissioner’s office — but not the commissioner himself — from Monday through Wednesday at MLB headquarters in New York.

The topic du jour? McCourt, who requested the meetings, outlined his plans for retaining control of the Dodgers as he continues to go through divorce proceedings with Jamie McCourt. As we learned last month, a judge threw out a post-nuptial agreement between the two that would have granted Frank full ownership of the team.

Frank filed an objection to the ruling, but as it stands right now, he would have to pay Jamie a significant amount of money in order to keep the team. It’s not exactly clear what options were discussed this week, but Shaikin speculates that that he could get hundreds of millions of dollars by either negotiating a new television deal or selling a minority share of the team, then using that money to settle his divorce.

The thing is, Bud Selig could reject any new television deal or partnership agreement. He could also reject short-term financing available to owners from MLB.

If that wasn’t bad enough, it sounds like he is losing support of other MLB owners.

“I can’t imagine one vote going against Bud on anything having to do with the Dodgers,” said the owner, who declined to be identified because Selig has not authorized him to speak on the issue.

In other words, Bud Selig may not force Frank to put the Dodgers up for sale, but he could make it very difficult for him to have any other choice.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”