Peter Moylan may or may not be in the best shape of his life

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I’ve been checking in and out of the blog of Braves reliever Peter Moylan all winter.  Being a Braves fan I was happy to learn back in November that Moylan — not exactly a man with abs of steel — was on a bigtime conditioning program.  Given that Bobby Cox worked Moylan to death these past few years — throwing him in 80+ games immediately after he came back from Tommy John surgery — conditioning is probably pretty important for him as he gets older.

Imagine my shock and horror, however, when I saw this tweet from him this afternoon, back in Georgia after flying in from Australia a couple of days ago:

Jet lag is kicking my butt. Woke up at 3am yesterday and 5am today. Thank god for Waffle House

Ahhh!  You can’t do that Peter! We shlubs can get that scattered-smothered-chunked-and-diced goodness when we need it, but you’re a professional athlete! We need you to get those tough outs against the Phillies! That is, if they ever get a righty who can hit worth a damn!

I tweeted my alarm, and thankfully, within minutes, Moylan set my mind at ease:

@craigcalcaterra egg whites and dry wheat toast!!!!!!!!!

Thank goodness.

When does spring training start?

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.