Must-Click Link: Catching up with Jim Joyce

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As a short-attention-span blogger, it makes my head hurt to think about travelling a couple thousand miles, talking to someone for hours and then spending several days writing several thousand insightful words about the experience.  Really, I tend to lose interest in what I’m writing approximately two minutes after I think of the snarky punchline.

Thankfully not everyone else is like me or else we’d be in a journalistic wilderness.  We need our nutrition as readers, and that nutrition comes in the form of long-form feature pieces on the people and events that shape the game we love.  There isn’t anyone who does that better than ESPN’s Amy K. Nelson. She pretty much knocks every subject she chooses out of the park, and today is no exception: Jim Joyce: infamous umpire:

“I think about it still, almost every day,” Joyce says. “I don’t want to be known as Jim Joyce, the guy that blew the perfect game. But I think that’s inevitable.”

Why?

“Because I’m Jim Joyce,” he says, “the umpire who blew the perfect game.”

Take your early-afternoon coma off today and check out Nelson’s piece about the man who cost Armando Galarraga his perfect game and somehow came out better for it on the other end.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.