The Mets are testing some grand business management theories or something

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I don’t like the Mets very much, but I really hate business books. As such, this article in today’s Wall Street Journal about how a book analyzing what happens to businesses who collect brains rather than promote from within relates to the Mets was a bit of a slog.  Some of you may like it though:

… “stars” who moved to new organizations in teams or “packs” performed better than those who moved individually, for their relationships with each other made it easier to replicate the conditions that had made them successful in the first place. Dr. Groysberg called such connections “relationship human capital.” And for Mr. DePodesta, 38, who regards “Moneyball” as a treatise not on how to evaluate athletic talent but on how to exploit “stagnant systems,” “Chasing Stars” represents another opportunity to test business theories and principles in what might at first seem an unorthodox setting.

I know I’m supposed to be all forward-thinking and sabermetrically-friendly, but after reading this article, I’d like nothing more than to hear about a team who hired a crusty old GM who eats pastrami sandwiches and says stuff like “we need some fellas who can really hit the snot out of the ball, see?”

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.