Former player, manager, scout Steve Boros dies

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Never heard of Steve Boros? Here’s some background.  Here’s some more. And here’s a signature accomplishment:

Boros was part of a scout team that filled out reports that fall on the Athletics, the Dodgers’ opponent in the World Series. Among the traits that Boros and his co-workers noticed: Oakland relief ace Dennis Eckersley tended to throw a backdoor slider on 3-2 counts to left-handed hitters.

That was exactly the pitch that pinch-hitter Kirk Gibson launched off Eck for a two-out, bottom-of-the-ninth homer to win Game 1. The Dodgers went on to upset the mighty A’s in five games.

I can’t imagine a situation that would give a bigger rush to a scout. I mean, yes, finding an obscure player, getting him signed and watching him turn into an MVP may be a bigger accomplishment, but that happens over years.  With the homer, in one moment Boros and the guys he worked with were able to whoop it up over a series of feats: finding the chink in the mighty Eck’s armor, successfully communicating it to the Dodgers and having a player put it to use.

How many tells like that are missed?  How many that are caught get lost someplace between the scout’s notepad and the player in the batter’s box?  A bunch I bet. And if Gibson was flying blind up there against Eck, is there any way that he hits that homer? It’s not like he could adjust or muscle a ball out with that gimpy leg of his. The only shot he had was to know where the pitch was going to be before it was thrown.  Go watch the replay. He doesn’t put a powerful swing on the ball. Just a perfect swing. Because he knew exactly what was coming.

R.I.P., Steve Boros.

Jung Ho Kang granted work visa to re-enter the U.S.

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Rob Biertempfel of The Athletic reports that third baseman Jung Ho Kang has been granted a work visa and will soon rejoin the Pirates. Kang had previously not been allowed to enter the U.S. after he was arrested for his third DUI in Seoul in December 2016.

There was some thought that Kang wouldn’t ever play for the Pirates again, but things have worked out in his favor. It will still likely be a while until he actually appears in a major league game, as he will need to get back into game shape and up to game speed.

Pirates president Frank Coonelly said, “After a lengthy process, we are pleased that Jung Ho has been allowed to re-enter the United States. We are encouraged by the steps that Jung Ho has taken to date and are hopeful that having the games he loves taken away from him for more than a year has driven home the reality that he must make better life decisions as we move forward together.

As we have communicated to him throughout this process, we will work to provide Jung Ho with the resources and support necessary for him to meet the high expectations that we have for him as a member of our organization and our community.”

The Pirates signed Kang as an international free agent out of South Korea to a four-year, $11 million contract in January 2015. If he were to appear in the majors this season, he would earn a prorated $3 million. He has a club option for next season worth $5.5 million with a $250,000 buyout.