The guys on the Hall of Fame ballot who have no shot but are worth talking about anyway


Day two of Joe Posnanski’s week-long look at the Hall of Fame consists of his review of the 11 players on this year’s ballot who are clearly not Hall of Famers, but who, according to Joe, are worth spending a few minutes remembering.  The Carlos Baergas and Brett Boones of the world, don’t you know.

I’m glad that Posnanski goes through them in detail because these are the guys who we’ll find more interesting and mysterious several years from now. Everyone knows Roberto Almoar’s career backwards and forwards at this point. People will soon forget that, say, Carlos Baerga got 200 hits in a season twice. Or that Marquis Grissom, while not necessarily better than you remember, was a really unique  player.  Heck, most people have probably already forgotten. A lot of those guys are described by Joe with phrases like “and suddenly, one day, he stopped being really good.”  Yeah, it was the time for that.

It’s a good read. It helps us to remember that, while eras are defined by the superstars, most of the working and paying, living and dying, pitching and hitting in Major League Baseball is done by regular guys.  Thanks to Joe for bearing witness to some of them here.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.