If you suspect Jeff Bagwell of ‘roiding, why not suspect everyone?

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My totally unscientific sense of things is that Jeff Bagwell is going to fall well short of the Hall of Fame in this his first year on the ballot. Peter Gammons suspects as much. And, after making the case of just how clear a Hall of Famer Bagwell is, has some pointed words for the wait-and-see-on-Bagwell crowd:

We have media members who believe in a black-and-white one-and-done code when it comes to Cooperstown. We have those who believe their eyes are enough when it comes to making judgment, bifocals or no bifocals. Two springs ago, Mike Piazza asked, “How can someone write that I was a steroid user because of acne? When did I fail any test?” Thankfully, Piazza pushes that issue, as one of the greatest offensive catchers and a surefire Hall of Fame performer. Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa and Roger Clemens are going to be fascinating votes in future years, all very different case studies that will dictate prolonged, complex debates.

Meanwhile, Bagwell never failed any test, to our knowledge. Did he lose body mass later in his career? Yes; so did the indefatigable gym rat Carlton Fisk after he stopped lifting for hours every day.

I have seen no one make a purely merit-based case against Bagwell. It’s all either vague “let’s wait and see” stuff or vague references to the inflated offensive numbers of the 1990s. A few have specifically mentioned PEDs, but only a few.  In reality, I think that just about everyone not voting for Bagwell is doing so because they think he did steroids.

And I suppose I see why a big power hitter of the 90s is under suspicion, but where does it all end?  If you suspect Bagwell, why don’t you suspect Frank Thomas? Because he said he didn’t do steroids? Hell, so did Palmeiro. Do you suspect Piazza? Biggio? Randy Johnson? All of them did quite amazing things too. Given that big players, small players, fast players, slow players, pitchers, hitters, stars and scrubs have all been connected to PEDs, why isn’t everyone a suspect? And if they are, why isn’t everyone getting the Jeff Bagwell treatment?

The level of subjectivity being applied in this arena is doing more harm to the Hall of Fame than letting in one person who was later found to have  done steroids would ever do.

Three A’s rookies hit their first big league home runs on Saturday

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The Athletics followed Friday’s 3-0 shutout with a rookie-led home run derby on Saturday afternoon, watching not one, not two, but three rookies belt their first major league home runs off of the White Sox’ James Shields.

Right fielder Matt Olson was the first to strike, taking Shields deep on a first-pitch, two-run blast in the first inning for his first home run in 49 major league plate appearances:

Fellow outfielder Jaycob Brugman duplicated his teammate’s results in the second inning with a solo home run, his first extra-base hit of any kind since he made his debut on June 9:

In the third, with a comfortable 4-0 lead backing two scoreless frames from Oakland right-hander Daniel Gossett, Franklin Barreto took his shot at Shields. After getting the call several hours prior to Saturday’s game, he became the fastest of the three rookies to record his first big league homer, going yard on a 2-2 changeup and driving in Bruce Maxwell to give the A’s a six-run advantage.

The Athletics currently lead the White Sox 8-2 in the top of the sixth inning.

Athletics call up top prospect Franklin Barreto

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The Athletics called up their top prospect on Saturday, inserting shortstop Franklin Barreto into the lineup for their second game against the White Sox. Barreto was originally scheduled to make his major league debut on Sunday, but got a head start after Jed Lowrie sustained a minor knee sprain in Friday’s 3-0 win and was scratched from Saturday’s lineup.

Barreto, 21, has been rapidly climbing the rungs of the A’s minor league system after getting dealt by the Blue Jays in 2014. He got his first taste of Triple-A action late last year, going 6-for-17 with three RBI and getting caught stealing in two attempts. He fared little better this spring, slashing .281/.326/.428 with eight home runs and a .754 OPS through his first 309 PA in Nashville.

While his minor league production has been solid, if underwhelming for a prospect of his caliber, the A’s are expected to give the rookie infielder a long leash with both Marcus Semien and Chad Pinder sitting on the disabled list. Pinder landed on the 10-day DL after suffering a left hamstring strain on Friday. Semien, meanwhile, is still working his way back from the 60-day DL with a right wrist fracture and likely won’t rejoin the team until he completes a rehab assignment with High-A Stockton.