stack of money

A team-by-team breakdown of offseason spending so far

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I’ve seen a few posts around the web in which writers have reported how much money in contracts teams have handed out in total this winter — I think we’re at or near a billion now — but I find that to be rather abstract and not entirely useful. In contrast, however, Ben Nicholson-Smith at MLB Trade Rumors put a great post up late last night breaking down how much each team has spent so far this offseason. That’s something I can get my arms and mind around a bit more easily.

No surprise: the Red Sox have spent the most, making $172 million in commitments, and that’s not even counting the inevitable Adrian Gonzalez contract extension that will come in the spring. The Nats and Phillies are two and three. Again, no shock there. What is shocking: that the Marlins have out-spent the Cubs, Mets and Braves.

On average teams have committed $40 million each to new contracts this winter. The median, however, is only $19 million, so yeah, there are a small handful of teams propping up the mean.

Definitely click through, as Nicholson-Smith breaks each team’s expenditures down by player.

Jason Kipnis plans to play through a disgusting-looking ankle sprain

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 14:  Jason Kipnis #22 of the Cleveland Indians fields the ball against the Toronto Blue Jays during game one of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 14, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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Jason Kipnis sprained his ankle while celebrating the Indians ALCS win over the Blue Jays. In the runup to tonight’s game, Terry Francona has said that Kipnis would be fine, that he’s a gamer, etc., etc. You know, the usual “when the bell rings, all of the aches and pains go away” kind of thing.

Today, however, we see that this sprained ankle is maybe not your run-of-the-mill late season bump or bruise:


Um, yikes.

Indians beat writer jumps in Lake Erie to settle a bet

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Back in September Cleveland Plain Dealer beat writer Paul Hoynes ruffled a lot of feathers when he declared the Indians DOA. His rationale: too many injuries to Indians starters weakened the club too greatly. Even if they did make the playoffs, Hoynes argued, they wouldn’t go far.

A reader made a bet with him at the time: if the Indians didn’t make the World Series, he’d jump in Lake Erie. If they did, Hoynes would.

Today Hoynes made good on his bet. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen a baseball writer drop trou, by the way: