Winningest pitchers of decades that happened to touch the 1980s

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This morning I noted how random and misleading it was to give credit to Jack Morris for being the winningest pitcher of the 1980s.  After reading it, my friend Ethan suggested that I try to figure out who the winningest pitchers were for decades that happened to intersect with the 1980s. So I did.  Here are the results with names and win totals (UPDATE: and here’s a fun graph of it all):

1971-1980: Steve Carlton  192
1972-1981: Steve Carlton  185
1973-1982: Steve Carlton 181
1974-1983: Steve Carlton 183
1975-1984: Steve Carlton 180
1976-1985: Steve Carlton 166
1977-1986: Ron Guidry 163
1978-1987: Jack Morris 161
1979-1988: Jack Morris 173
1980-1989: Jack Morris 162
1981-1990: Jack Morris 161
1982-1991: Jack Morris 165
1983-1992: Jack Morris 169
1984-1993: Roger Clemens 163
1985-1994: Roger Clemens 163
1986-1995: Roger Clemens 166
1987-1996: Greg Maddux 163
1988-1997: Greg Maddux 176
1989-1998: Greg Maddux 176

Poor Ron Guidry. Born too early! If he had simply started his excellent ten-year run in a year ending in zero, he’d be in the Hall of Fame discussion too!

UPDATE:  Because this is fun and easy, I went five more years in each direction:

66-75:  Gaylord Perry 192
67-76:  Fergie Jenkins 195
68-77:  Tom Seaver 187
69-78:  Jim Palmer 192
70-79:   Jim Palmer 186

90-99:  Greg Maddux  176
91-00:  Greg Maddux 180
92-01:  Greg Maddux 182
93-02:  Greg Maddux 178
94-03:  Greg Maddux 174

If baseball was a video game, Greg Maddux would be the Final Boss.

Report: The White Sox and Diamondbacks are in on Manny Machado

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Buster Olney of ESPN reports that the White Sox and Diamondbacks have emerged as two of the strongest contenders for Orioles third baseman Manny Machado. It seems like a foregone conclusion that Baltimore will deal their superstar infielder this winter, but nothing appears imminent just yet. While both the White Sox and D-backs have reportedly made serious offers, Orioles owner Peter Angelos is wary of any non-contending team that might be incentivized to flip Machado to the rival Yankees next season.

The White Sox, for their part, have assured the Orioles that they view Machado more as a solid one-year rental than the new face of their franchise, with no immediate plans to deal him elsewhere. Given their current rebuilding status and the unlikelihood that they would contend in 2018, it makes their offer a bit of a head-scratcher — and, as USA Today Sports’ Bob Nightengale points out, they’ve been reluctant to put any top-5 prospects on the table in preliminary negotiations.

The Diamondbacks, on the other hand, are far better positioned to enter the postseason in 2018, though that doesn’t automatically make them the perfect landing spot for Machado. They already have Jake Lamb stationed at third base, and while it’s not inconceivable that they could jettison the Ketel Marte/Chris Owings/Nick Ahmed shortstop platoon for someone of Machado’s talent, his $17 million salary appears to be more than the D-backs are currently capable of absorbing.

The White Sox and D-backs may have exhibited the most interest in Machado so far, but they’re hardly the only contenders here. MASN Sports’ Roch Kubatko maintains that the Cardinals and Yankees remain in discussions for the 25-year-old, with Cardinals’ RHP Jordan Hicks and catcher Carson Kelly drawing interest, as well as Yankees’ top prospect Gleyber Torres. Any deal involving the Yankees still feels like a long shot, however; as Craig mentioned on Wednesday, it makes sense that the club wouldn’t want to see their star player hanging around their division rivals in 2018, and the Yankees should be well prepared to make a run at him in free agency next winter.