Jack Morris won more games in the 80s than anyone. So what?

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So much of the Hall of Fame support for Jack Morris is premised on the idea that he won more games in the 80s than anyone.  FanHouse’s John Hickey wrote about that just yesterday. There are many others who have and will as well.  Question: why does that matter?

Any single decade is an arbitrary measure. Sure, “the 1980s” is a decade. But so is “1995-2004.”  So is “1977-1986.”  Just because the nostalgia industry and the tyranny of the base-10 numbering system gives special significance to decades with catchy names doesn’t mean that those given ten-year periods are worth more than any other.  There are a great many pitchers whose careers overlapped Morris’ on either the front end or the back end who were better than him for their own ten-year chunks. To give credit to Morris for “the 1980s” is more a function of us being more comfortable with round numbers than his abilities as a pitcher.

But even if “the 80s” mattered, shouldn’t we also acknowledge that the 80s was probably the weakest decade for starting pitchers in the 20th century?  It was a brief bubble between two generations of elite starters, with the Seaver/Palmer/Carlton/Perry/Niekro/Ryan crown winding down and the Clemens/Maddux/Johnson crowd cranking up (or in Johnson’s case, about to).  Being the best starting pitcher of the 80s is like being the strongest football team in Alaska. The best vaudeville performer of the 21st century. The most skilled archer in an artillery division. The finest restaurant in all of  Saginaw, Michigan.

Someone has to hold that title, sure, but does it mean anything? Should it be honored?

Here are the winningest pitchers by decade.  Tell me: are any of their Hall of Fame cases premised on being the winningest pitcher of the decade? Or was their value more apparent?

1900s – Christy Mathewson
1910s – Walter Johnson
1920s – Burleigh Grimes
1930s – Lefty Grove
1940s – Hal Newhouser
1950s – Warren Spahn
1960s – Juan Marichal
1970s – Jim Palmer
1980s – Jack Morris
1990s – Greg Maddux
2000s – Andy Pettitte

Another question: was Morris better than any of them? Probably Burleigh Grimes, who is actually a hell of a lot like Morris but had the added benefit of being able to throw a legal spitball when his competition could not. An argument could be made regarding Newhouser, whose Hall of Fame case was greatly aided by pitching against 4-F rosters during World War II, though he was effective and successful after the war too. I’d say that Pettitte is better than Morris even if I don’t really think he’s a Hall of Famer either.

Over the course of 110 years, I’m pretty comfortable leaving a couple of the decade wins leaders out. There’s no rule that says they all have to be in.  And Morris is clearly at or near the bottom of that class.

Odubel Herrera went 0-for-5 with five strikeouts today

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Did you have a bad day? It’s OK. We all do sometimes. It’s just part of life. Even ballplayers have bad days. Even the good ones.

Odubel Herrera is a good one. He’s only 25, but he’s already got two seasons of above average hitting under his belt. Dude gets on base. He could be a regular for tons of teams, so there’s no shame at all in him having a bad day. And boy howdy did he have a bad day today. He went 0-for-5 with five strikeouts in the Phillies extra innings win against the Rockies.

“I feel that I am making good swings but I’m just missing the pitches,” Herrera said.

Well, that is how strikeouts work.

Four strikeouts in a game is known as a Golden Sombrero. Players don’t strike out five times in a game very often so they don’t have an agreed upon name, but I’ve seen it referred to as the “platinum sombrero,” which seems pretty solid for such a feat. Six is a titanium sombrero or a double platinum sombrero, though there are references to it as a “Horn,” for Sam Horn, who deserves something to be named in his honor. Horn is like Moe Greene — a great man, a man of vision and guts — yet there isn’t even a plaque, or a signpost or a statue of him!

But I digress.

The last time a Phillies player did it was when Pat Burrell K’d five times in September 2008. The Phillies won the World Series that year, of course, so maybe this is an omen. [looks at standings] Or maybe not.

Anyway, get a good night’s sleep tonight, Odubel. Shake it off. Tomorrow is another day.

Rachel Robinson to receive O’Neil Award from the Hall of Fame

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NEW YORK (AP) Rachel Robinson will receive the Buck O’Neil Lifetime Achievement Award from baseball’s Hall of Fame on July 29, the day before this year’s induction ceremony.

She’s the wife of late Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, who broke the major league color barrier in 1947. Rachel Robinson created the Jackie Robinson Foundation in 1973, a year after he husband’s death. Rachel Robinson, who turns 95 in July 19, headed the foundation’s board until 1996.

The O’Neil award was established in 2007 to honor individuals who broaden the game’s appeal and whose character is comparable to that of O’Neil. He played in the Negro Leagues, was a scout for major league baseball teams and helped establish the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri.

The award was given to O’Neil in 2008, Roland Hemond in 2011 and Joe Garagiola in 2014.