Nobody knows Zack Greinke

24 Comments

I’ve written a lot recently about how no one can simply assume that Zack Greinke’s history with anxiety disorder makes him unsuitable for pitching in New York. Indeed, it could easily be the opposite — he’s at his best when he’s successful and at his worst when facing adversity — and thus the winning and the pressure of winning with the Yankees could actually be better for him than losing in Kansas City. Ask yourself: wouldn’t having Brett Gardner chasing down the flies you gave up to left field make you feel better than having Melky Cabrera do it next season?

The point is, we have no idea what makes Zack Greinke tick, and to the extent you read about someone who sounds absolutely certain that he couldn’t hack it in New York, you can be assured that they’re just guessing.

Joe Posnanski has been around and written more about Zack Greinke than just about anyone, and last night he posted a story that illustrates just how wild the guesses truly are.  And no, Joe doesn’t think he knows anything more about what makes Greinke tick than anyone else. That’s the takeaway:

Chauncey Gardiner from the movie “Being There” was the simple gardner of a rich man who wandered into the world and found people eager to infuse their own hopes and ideas and thoughts into his childlike words. Greinke is not simple, and his words are not childlike, but here he is, America’s Most Wanted Pitcher, and everybody seems to know what he wants, where he’d succeed, where he’d fail. So you know Krylov in Russian, do you? Some may be right. Some certainly are wrong. But if there’s one thing I have learned about Zack Greinke that I feel confident in saying it is this: Nobody really knows.

I know I say this a lot about his stuff, but Joe’s story is an absolute must-read. Certainly a must-read for Yankees fans and anyone who is interested in where Greinke might be traded.

Nothing went Adrian Beltre’s way last night

Getty Images
Leave a comment

It was an unfortunate night on the base paths for future Hall of Famer Adrian Beltre in the A’s-Rangers game. First because of, you guessed it, The Man, and second because of the Fates and maybe Father Time.

As far as The Man goes, someplace in the rule book it says that, after a foul ball, the ball is dead until pitcher has the new ball and is ready to pitch. Beltre was counting on people either not knowing that rule or acknowledging that it’s a lame rule which kills the chances for fun. He was standing on first base when Jurickson Profar fouled one off. After the ump handed Jonathan Lucroy a new ball, Lucroy tossed it back wildly to the pitcher and . . . Beltre just took the hell off, ending up on third.

It’s the third highlight in this three-part highlight reel:

 

Here it is in GIF form:

I think he should’ve been award third base on chutzpah alone, but no one asks me about such things.

Less fun was when Beltre singled in the bottom of the eighth. It would’ve been a double — he hit a line drive to right-center that one-hopped the wall — but he just barely got to first, having strained his left hamstring running down the line, forcing him out of the game.

Beltre will be evaluated today, but this will almost certainly mean a trip to the DL for the 39-year-old. He’s the third Opening Day infielder the Rangers have lost to injury so far on the young season.