I am genuinely worried about Jose Canseco

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I continue to watch Jose Canseco’s online meltdown. And as I said the other day, I don’t do so for mocking purposes. I’m genuinely worried about the guy. If you had a friend who spoke frequently about regret and anger and desperation the way Canseco has in the past week, you’d try to get them into counseling.

The latest, from early this morning:

I guess I wrote the book juiced out of blind anger cause baseball was taken away from me.I am truly sorry for that

This isn’t significant for the book’s sake. It stands on its own and, whatever motivated it, it has largely stood up, factually speaking.  But think about it: for the past seven or eight years, “Juiced” has been Canseco’s singular accomplishment and his primary reason for public existence. And he’s now apologizing for it. And downplaying the effects of steroids in multiple other tweets. And begging for a job in baseball. We’re in stages of grief territory here.

I know that playing armchair psychiatrist like this is fraught with peril, but is there anyone else out there worried about this guy? Anyone keeping an eye on him? Are there psychological services available to ex-players through the union or something?  Because really, I think this is starting to get a little scary.

Jered Weaver dealing with “dead arm”

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Padres starter Jered Weaver lasted just two-thirds of an inning in Wednesday afternoon’s Cactus League appearance against the Royals. He yielded four runs on three hits, throwing 31 pitches before getting pulled. His spring ERA now sits at an ugly 10.13.

Weaver said he’s been dealing with a “dead arm” since his last bullpen session, but added he’s dealt with the issue in previous springs, Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

The Padres signed Weaver to a one-year, $3 million contract last month. The right-hander is coming off of the worst season of his 11-year career. His fastball averaged a career-low 83 MPH and he put up a 5.06 ERA with a 103/51 K/BB ratio in 178 innings.

Ian Kinsler doesn’t think Puerto Rico or Dominican Republic players play the game the right way

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Update: Whoops…

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Earlier, Craig wrote about Dan Duquette’s dogwhistle language in his criticism of Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista. We have some more dogwhistling, this time coming from Tigers (and Team U.S.) second baseman Ian Kinsler. Via Billy Witz of The New York Times:

I hope kids watching the W.B.C. can watch the way we play the game and appreciate the way we play the game as opposed to the way Puerto Rico plays or the Dominican plays. That’s not taking anything away from them. That just wasn’t the way we were raised. They were raised differently and to show emotion and passion when you play. We do show emotion; we do show passion. But we just do it in a different way.

The goal of the World Baseball Classic, created by Major League Baseball, is to promote baseball across the globe. It’s players like Puerto Rico’s Javier Baez who are doing the best job in that regard, not boring white guys from the U.S. Potential baseball fans are not swayed into liking the sport when a player hits a home run and solemnly puts his head down to stroll the bases. They get excited and energized when players show emotion, flip their bats, celebrate. Baez did more to make baseball appeal to new and lapsed audiences with his premature celebration tag than the entire U.S. team has done this tournament.

Furthermore, it is hypocritical to want to diversify the sport’s audience while squelching incoming cultures.

Jim Leyland also got in on the action:

Go Puerto Rico.