Murray Chass

Blogger admits mistake; apologizes

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It’s always good to see bloggers be accountable for their mistakes. Even when the blogger doesn’t believe that he’s actually a blogger. Here’s Murray Chass, explaining his post in which he slammed Tom Verducci for voting against Marvin Miller for the Hall of Fame, even though Verducci voted for him:

When I reported his alleged no vote, I was basing it on what Miller told me he had heard. Miller was not wrong for telling me what he heard; I was wrong for reporting it without checking it. The blame is strictly mine.

In 99.99 percent – no, make that 100 percent – of previous articles or columns, I checked something like that and confirmed it to my satisfaction before writing it. I should have done that in this instance and not taken a shortcut, but I was unable to because I was out of the country on vacation with no access to information, such as telephone numbers or e-mail addresses, for people who might have known.

In retrospect, I should not have identified anyone as having voted against Miller; I should just have let the numbers speak for themselves. Had I subsequently been able to identify the nay-sayers, I could have then named them. It is a routine I would have followed in every other instance and should have this time. I regret that I did not. I further regret any embarrassment I might have caused Miller and Verducci.

We’re all wrong on occasion.  Good for Chass for owning it and apologizing. Would that more of us do that when we whiff.

UPDATE:  Joe Posnanski — who rarely rips people — completely eviscerates the Chass apology. I’ll admit that I didn’t think too hard about the quality of Chass’ apology when I linked it this morning. I was pleased enough to even see acknowledgement of an error, which we hardly ever see these days. But after reading Posnanski’s thing, I gotta admit: he nailed it.

A fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 24:  A fan is escorted by police out of the New York Yankees dugout after climbing onto its roof, stumbling and falling into the dugout during the game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on August 24, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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Per Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, a fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field in the eighth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Mariners.

The Yankees were heading into the bottom half of the inning when catcher Brian McCann heard “a loud thud” and looked over to find a fan laying on the dugout floor. According to McCann, the fan “basically knocked himself out.”

Manager Joe Girardi said the incident “kind of freaked me out, actually.”

McCann added, “You don’t know his intentions. It looked like he was trying to run on the field, but he didn’t make it there. It could have been worse.”

That McCann and Girardi aren’t immediately trusting of an uninvited visitor to the dugout has merit. In 2002, two fans ran onto the field and attacked Tom Gamboa, then the Royals’ first base coach. One of the two was in possession of a knife. Typically, fans that trespass are drunk and want attention, but to echo McCann’s sentiment, you never know.

Yu Darvish hit a home run

CINCINNATI, OH - AUGUST 24: Yu Darvish #11 of the Texas Rangers grounds into a double play in the second inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park on August 24, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
Joe Robbins/Getty Images
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There’s a headline you’ve never read before. Rangers starter Yu Darvish has taken 12 plate appearances in the major leagues over parts of four seasons and has yet to homer. Not surprising. He pitches in the American League and wasn’t a particularly great hitter when he pitched in Japan, either. He had four singles and a double in 38 PA over parts of seven seasons from 2005-11.

Which made this all the better:

That was a 1-2 fastball from Reds starter Tim Adleman and Darvish hit it out to dead center field at Great American Ball Park. That’s a ride.