Mark Buehrle providing aid for dog shot with arrow

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White Sox starter Mark Buehrle is the anti-Michael Vick.  Or, the opposite of what Vick used to be.

According to Terry Hillig of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Buehrle has offered to pay any uncovered medical expenses for a dog who was found stranded in southern Illinois this weekend with an arrow in its abdomen.

The arrow, presumably shot from a deer hunting bow, caused severe damage to the four-year-old dog’s spleen and part of its intestines, but there’s a good chance for a full recovery.

Buehrle is a native of St. Charles, MO, a western suburb of St. Louis.  It just so happens that he was mentioned this morning in Nick Cafardo’s Sunday notes column in the Boston Globe.  The White Sox are apparently listening to offers for the left-hander, who will hit free agency after the 2011 season.

Buehrle, 31, went 13-13 with a 4.28 ERA and 1.40 WHIP over 33 starts in 2010, fanning 99 batters and walking 49 across 210.1 innings.  He also won a second straight Gold Glove.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.