Adam Dunn

Tracking the top 111 free agents

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Here’s the rundown to date of the contracts received by my top 111 free agents. The list below doesn’t include free agents signed before the end of October (most notably, Ted Lilly) or non-tender free agents such as Russell Martin.

111. Dave Bush (Brewers – Age 31):
110. Carlos Delgado (Red Sox – Age 38):
109. Craig Counsell (Brewers – Age 40):
108. Gerald Laird (Tigers – Age 31):
107. Joe Crede (FA – Age 32):
106. Adam Kennedy (Nationals – Age 35):
105. Jason Varitek (Red Sox – Age 38): Red Sox – one year, $2 million
104. Melky Cabrera (Braves – Age 26): Royals – one year, $1.25 million
103. Pedro Martinez (FA – Age 39):
102. Jeremy Bonderman (Tigers – Age 28):
101. Kyle Farnsworth (Braves – Age 34):
100. Jerry Hairston Jr. (Padres – Age 34):
99. Justin Duchscherer (Athletics – Age 33):
98. Gregg Zaun (Brewers – Age 39):
97. Chad Qualls (Rays – Age 32):
96. Cesar Izturis (Orioles – Age 31): Orioles – one year, $1.5 million
95. Jose Contreras (Phillies – Age 39): Phillies – two years, $5.5 million
94. Andruw Jones (White Sox – Age 33):
93. Felipe Lopez (Red Sox – Age 30):
92. Chad Durbin (Phillies – Age 33):
91. Jorge Cantu (Rangers – Age 29):
90. J.C. Romero (Phillies – Age 34):
89. Nick Johnson (Yankees – Age 32):
88. Trevor Hoffman (Brewers – Age 43):
87. Bengie Molina (Rangers – Age 36):
86. Kevin Correia (Padres – Age 30): Pirates – two years, $8 million
85. Rick Ankiel (Braves – Age 31):
84. Nick Punto (Twins – Age 33):
83. Brandon Webb (Diamondbacks – Age 31):
82. Ty Wigginton (Orioles – Age 33) – Rockies – two years, $7.5 million
81. Freddy Garcia (White Sox – Age 34):
80. Edgar Renteria (Giants – Age 35):
79. Xavier Nady (Cubs – Age 32) :
78. Takashi Saito (Braves – Age 41):
77. Rod Barajas (Dodgers – Age 35): Dodgers – one year, $3.25 million
76. Jose Guillen (Giants – Age 34):
75. Scott Podsednik (Dodgers – Age 35):
74. Dan Wheeler (Rays – Age 33):
73. Rich Harden (Rangers – Age 29):
72. Yorvit Torrealba (Padres – Age 32): Rangers – two years, $6.25 million
71. Erik Bedard (Mariners – Age 32): Mariners – one year, $1 million
70. Doug Davis (Brewers – Age 35):
69. Cristian Guzman (Rangers – Age 33):
68. Russell Branyan (Mariners – Age 35):
67. Miguel Olivo (Rockies – Age 32): Mariners – two years, $7 million
66. Orlando Cabrera (Reds – Age 36):
65. Arthur Rhodes (Reds – Age 41):
64. Troy Glaus (Braves – Age 34):
63. Ramon Hernandez (Reds – Age 34): Reds – one year, $3 million
62. Miguel Tejada (Padres – Age 36): Giants – one year, $6.5 million
61. Jason Frasor (Blue Jays – Age 33): Blue Jays – accepted arbitration
60. Lyle Overbay (Blue Jays – Age 34):
59. Octavio Dotel (Rockies – Age 37):
58. Jhonny Peralta (Tigers – Age 28): Tigers – two years, $11.25 million
57. Kevin Millwood (Orioles – Age 36):
56. Bill Hall (Red Sox – Age 31):
55. Matt Guerrier (Twins – Age 32):
54. Pat Burrell (Giants – Age 34): Giants – one year, $1 million
53. Koji Uehara (Orioles – Age 35): Orioles – one year, $3 million
52. Hideki Matsui (Angels – Age 36):
51. Jesse Crain (Twins – Age 29):
50. Jim Thome (Twins – Age 40):
49. Kevin Gregg (Blue Jays – Age 32):
48. Chris Young (Padres – Age 31):
47. Jon Rauch (Twins – Age 32):
46. Aaron Harang (Reds – Age 32): Padres – one year, $4 million
45. Frank Francisco (Rangers – Age 31): Rangers – accepted arbitration
44. John Buck (Blue Jays – Age 30): Marlins – three years, $18 million
43. Pedro Feliciano (Mets – Age 34):
42. Brad Penny (Cardinals – Age 32):
41. Mark Ellis (Athletics – Age 33): Athletics – $6 million option exercised
40. J.J. Putz (White Sox – Age 34): Diamondbacks – two years, $10 million
39. Vicente Padilla (Dodgers – Age 33): Dodgers – one year, $2 million
38. Grant Balfour (Rays – Age 33):
37. Juan Uribe (Giants – Age 32): Dodgers – three years, $21 million
36. A.J. Pierzynski (White Sox- Age 34): White Sox – two years, $8 million
35. Brad Hawpe (Rays – Age 31):
34. Joaquin Benoit (Rays – Age 33): Tigers – three years, $16.5 million
33. Jeff Francis (Rockies – Age 30):
32. Coco Crisp (Athletics – Age 31): Athletics – $5.75 million option exercised
31. Kerry Wood (Yankees – Age 33):
30. Lance Berkman (Yankees – Age 35): Cardinals – one year, $8 million
29. Adam LaRoche (Diamondbacks – Age 31):
28. Orlando Hudson (Twins – Age 33):
27. Johnny Damon (Tigers – Age 37):
26. Scott Downs (Blue Jays – Age 35): Angels – three years, $15 million
25. Derrek Lee (Braves – Age 35):
24. Manny Ramirez (White Sox – Age 38):
23. Brian Fuentes (Twins – Age 35):
22. Magglio Ordonez (Tigers – Age 37):
21. Jon Garland (Padres – Age 31): Dodgers – one year, $5 million
20. Aubrey Huff (Giants – Age 34): Giants – two years, $22 million
19. Javier Vazquez (Yankees – Age 34): Marlins – one year, $7 million
18. Vladimir Guerrero (Rangers – Age 36):
17. Jake Westbrook (Cardinals – Age 33): Cardinals – two years, $16.5 million
16. David Ortiz (Red Sox – Age 35): Red Sox – $12.5 million option exercised
15. Rafael Soriano (Rays – Age 31):
14. Carlos Pena (Rays – Age 32): Cubs – one year, $10 million
13. Andy Pettitte (Yankees – Age 38):
12. Carl Pavano (Twins – Age 35):
11. Jorge De La Rosa (Rockies – Age 29): Rockies – three years, $32 million
10. Hiroki Kuroda (Dodgers – Age 36): Dodgers – one year, $12 million
9. Paul Konerko (White Sox – Age 35): White Sox – three years, $37.5 million
8. Victor Martinez (Red Sox – Age 32): Tigers – four years, $48 million
7. Mariano Rivera (Yankees – Age 41): Yankees – two years, $30 million
6. Derek Jeter (Yankees – Age 36): Yankees – three years, $51 million
5. Adrian Beltre (Red Sox – Age 31):
4. Adam Dunn (Nationals – Age 31): White Sox – four years, $56 million
3. Jayson Werth (Phillies – Age 31): Nationals – seven years, $126 million
2. Carl Crawford (Rays – Age 29): Red Sox – seven years, $142 million
1. Cliff Lee (Rangers – Age 32):

We’ll see a leaner Yasiel Puig in 2017. Just like we did in 2016.

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 25:  Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers tips his hat to Vin Scully as he announces his final home game for the Dodgers during the first inning against the Colorado Rockies at Dodger Stadium on September 25, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Yasiel Puig made a public appearance today. He was a guest barista at a Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf in Los Angeles as part of a charity . . . thing. I dunno. I just hope that, after finishing the foam on someone’s latte he airmailed it past his fellow barista at the counter and got it to the customer on the fly 300 feet away, after which he flipped the espresso machine. Gotta stay on-brand.

After that he talked about baseball. Puig, who was demoted last season and then brought back up in a part-time role, said that it’s his goal to be a starter again, if not in Los Angeles than someplace else. As for the someplace else, the Dodgers explored a Puig trade last season and it was thought they’d try again this offseason, but it’s been all quiet on that front.

What is Puig, for his part, doing to become a starter again? Getting in shape. From MLB.com:

Puig has been working out at Dodger Stadium the last two weeks. He is conditioning his leaner body to avoid injuries that have plagued him and working with batting coaches in search of regaining the impact bat that once had him on the verge of superstardom . . . The 6-foot-2 Puig, who last year was listed at 240 pounds, now has a personal chef to prepare healthier foods.

A leaner Puig. That’ll certainly be a game-changer, right?

Yet as a new season dawns, the team still hopes he can recapture the form he displayed as a rookie in 2013. The organization asked Puig to slim down and focus on durability rather than musculature. Friedman sounded pleased with the result. Puig had suggested he weighed about 240 pounds, down 15 from his listed weight in 2015.

Oops. That was from January 30, 2016.

If he keeps getting leaner each offseason eventually he’ll just disappear, right?

Corey Dickerson has lost 25 pounds

PORT CHARLOTTE, FL - FEBRUARY 25:  Corey Dickerson #10 of the Tampa Bay Rays poses for a photo during the Rays' photo day on February 25, 2016 at Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Corey Dickerson of the Tampa Bay Rays wasn’t a super huge guy or anything, but he’s going to be smaller this year: he told reporters today that he’s lost 25 pounds. He attributes it to a new diet and a workout regimen and says it’ll help him with his running, swing and throwing.

Dickerson had a down year in 2016, so if losing 25 pounds is something he thinks will work for him he’s got nothing to lose. Of course the best way for him to improve his numbers is to convince the Rays to trade him back to Colorado, but that’s not likely.