The Angels sign Scott Downs to a three-year, $15 million contract

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UPDATE: Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com confirms it. The Angels have signed Downs to a three-year, $15 million contract. He could earn an additional $1 million based on games finished.

Downs, who turns 35 in March, posted a 2.64 ERA and 48/14 K/BB ratio over 61 1/3 innings this past season. The southpaw has a 2.36 ERA over 262 appearances since the beginning of the 2007 season.

Updating my previous entry, the Angels’ first-round pick (#14 overall) is protected in next year’s draft, so signing Downs (a Type A free agent) would cost them their second-round pick. If they signed Adrian Beltre — who has a higher Elias ranking — that pick would go to the Red Sox and the Blue Jays would receive the Angels’ third-round pick.

This isn’t exactly sticking it to the Red Sox for losing out on Crawford, but it’s obviously a little better than I originally thought. That being said, you would think this would have to take them out of the market for Rafael Soriano, right?

6:15 PM: Unless some “sick fake person” took over Peter Gammons’ Twitter account, it appears that the Angels may be close to signing Scott Downs to a three-year, $15 million contract.

That leaves me with this question. If signing Hisanori Takahashi to a two-year, $8 million contract was a “splash,” as Angels general manager Tony Regains described it the other day, would it be fair to classify Scott Downs as a tsunami?

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.