Mike Schmidt thinks that Jayson Werth kid has potential

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Mike Schmidt — the baseball player, not the New York Times reporter — has a column today in which he questions the wisdom of the Washington Nats’ deal with Jayson Werth.

I question the wisdom of it too, as do a lot of people. But what is striking about Schmidt’s criticism is that it’s based on Werth being a “young man” with “potential” who is “in his growth stage.” Of course, Jayson Werth will be 32 next season.  Almost everyone else who has criticized the deal has done so on the basis that he’s too old to be given seven years. So, yeah, this one is a bit different.

I will say, though, Schmidt’s use of one phrase has to give Nats’ fans the willies:

Jayson now will be the man, the cleanup hitter with the burden of production, far surpassing anything he has experienced.

That’s rather stark, and for as obvious as it is, I hadn’t thought of it in those terms since the signing. The notion of Werth being your best player — which, if the Nats don’t lock up Ryan Zimmerman, he may one day be — is kind of sobering. The young kid stuff aside, I agree with Schmidt that having so much riding on Jayson Werth is a bit scary.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.