Hank Steinbrenner thinks it would “behoove” Cliff Lee to be a Yankee

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Want the latest example of Yankee exceptionalism? Of course you do.

Here’s Yankees co-chairman Hank Steinbrenner, when asked about free-agent left-hander Cliff Lee by the Associated Press earlier today:

“For somebody of that stature, it would certainly behoove him to be a Yankee, which would probably be for the rest of his career. I think that would be a great move for him but, of course I’m prejudiced.”

Steinbrenner sounds pretty confident. And rightfully so, really. His club reportedly offered Lee a seven-year, $161 million contract that will be very difficult for the Rangers to top. In fact, a penny more and it would be the richest deal ever awarded to a pitcher.

Hank isn’t all that concerned about giving a seven-year deal to a 32-year-old pitcher, either.

“Looking at how well Andy pitched up until this year and so forth, and he’s a lefty, the same kind of pitcher as Andy, I don’t really see a problem,” Steinbrenner said. “I think Cliff’s the kind of guy that can get it done and be effective for a long time. He’s a great pitcher.”

That could very well be true, but let’s be honest, the Yankees aren’t going to concern themselves with what Lee will look like six or seven years from now. Why? Because they aren’t like you, or your favorite baseball team not named the Yankees. They are exceptional.

This is the same organization that witnessed Kevin Brown break down at the end of his seven-year, $105 million contract due to back problems. Most organizations would probably take a few notes from that experience, but you see, the Yankees play this free-agent game by different rules. Your albatross is their Kei Igawa.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: