Sports Illustrated’s Tom Verducci slams a blogger, but I heartily approve

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This is kinda insidey, but it had everyone at the Winter Meetings dying laughing in the bar last night, so it’s worth passing along.

When the vote for the Veteran’s Committee choices from the Hall of Fame came down on Monday, a lot of people in the media room started to speculate about who failed to support Marvin Miller. It was a fun game while it lasted, but everyone’s busy so people moved on.

Not former New York Times columnist Murray Chass. He spoke with Miller. Miller told him that he believed that Sports Illustrated’s Tom Verducci voted against him, and then Chass proceeded to rip Verducci, not just for his presumed vote against Miller, but saying that he wasn’t a good reporter and being a general jerk about it.  This seemed like an old grudge against a fellow former New York writer being revived.

Last night Verducci set the record straight saying he did vote for Marvin Miller, and related word that Miller, when informed of his error, apologized for passing Chass misinformation. Verducci also cited one of my previous posts about how Miller had walked back his comments about Jim Palmer the last time he spoke about the Veteran’s Committee, suggesting  that, hey, maybe Miller isn’t the most trustworthy source on all of this.

But it was so much more delicious than that.  Because in so doing, Verducci constantly refers to Chass as “the blogger.”  People who really follow the baseball media know that this is a giant insult to Chass, who has stridently said that he is not a blogger, because bloggers are irresponsible vermin. He says to right on his, um, blog, which he insists is not actually a blog even though it clearly is. So basically, each time Verducci says “the blogger,” you can and should read it as “the idiotically irresponsible Murray Chass,” because that’s what he really means.

It’s not often that you see guys with the knives out for each other like this in the baseball writing world.  And when you do, it’s pretty darn tasty actually.

Brandon Belt, Jaime Barrios set new modern record with 21-pitch at-bat

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Angels starter Jaime Barrios and Giants first baseman Brandon Belt set a new modern record with a 21-pitch at-bat in the first inning of Sunday afternoon’s game in Anaheim. Belt fell behind 1-2 and mostly kept fouling pitches off. The count ran full on the ninth pitch and Belt would foul off 11 more pitches before finally lining out to right field.

As Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle notes, the previous record was set on June 26, 1998 when the Indians’ Bartolo Colon and the Astros’ Ricky Gutierrez battled for 20 pitches. Gutierrez eventually struck out.