Mark Reynolds will not be going to the Padres

2 Comments

How will the Padres fill the void in their lineup left by Adrian Gonzalez? You can scratch Mark Reynolds off the list.

Jack McGruder of FOX Sports Arizona writes that the Padres aren’t a fit for Reynolds because the Diamondbacks want two relievers in return. The Padres already traded Ryan Webb and Edward Mujica to the Marlins in order to acquire Cameron Maybin last month, so assuming the Diamondbacks want somebody other than Heath Bell, Jed Hoyer is unlikely to deplete his bullpen even further.

The Orioles remain the most logical trade partner for Reynolds. Still, Jeff Zrebiec of the Baltimore Sun writes this morning that the O’s aren’t completely sold on the free-swinging third baseman and seems to think that they may be reluctant to part with right-hander Chris Tillman. Zrebiec echoes McGruder by saying that the Diamondbacks want a pair of young arms in return and mentions that right-hander David Hernandez and third baseman Josh Bell have come up in negotiations.

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

Getty Images
6 Comments

Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.