Joey Votto in no rush for a long-term contract

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All this talk about a contract extension for Adrian Gonzalez makes for a natural transition to National League MVP Joey Votto, who will be arbitration-eligible for the first time this winter.

Votto earned $525,000 this past season while batting .324/.424/.600 with with 37 home runs, 113 RBI and a 1.024 OPS. Faced with potential that he could make $7 million as a first-timer through the process, the Reds appear interested in at least buying out his arbitration years. While many Reds fans are hoping to have him locked up for the long-term, Votto indicated to Mark Sheldon of MLB.com that he’s in no rush to sign an extension.

“I don’t know as far as beyond three years. I think it’s a real unfair question to ask,” Votto said. “This is not me saying I don’t want to be here. But last year was a difficult year for me. This year was a better year for me. It’s really hard for me to think three years ahead, five years ahead, seven years ahead or 10 years ahead. When [Troy] Tulowitzki signed that 10-year contract [with the Rockies], I was blown away. I can’t imagine seeing myself 10 years from now saying I want to be here. It’s an overwhelming thing to ask a young person like myself and say ‘here’s a lot of money. Be happy with this over 10 years, deal with it.'”

Reds general manager Walt Jocketty informed John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer that he has had preliminary discussions with Votto’s agent, but that they haven’t “talked numbers yet.” Meanwhile, Votto told Sheldon earlier today that he doesn’t plan to give the Reds any sort of hometown discount as part of a long-term deal.

“I’m not going to disrespect the people ahead of me that paved the way for those types of earnings and the people behind me that expect a certain amount or fair value,” he said. “I don’t want to hurt the people behind me. That’s not fair.”

It’s a harsh reality, but that doesn’t mean there’s any reason for panic here. Votto, 27, remains under team control through 2013, so there’s still ample time to negotiate.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.