Ryan Zimmerman is not happy the Nats lost Dunn

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Here’s Nats’ third baseman Ryan Zimmerman reflecting on Adam Dunn going to the Chisox:

“Knowing that we had one of the three top free agents on our team and we didn’t want to resign him, it’s frustrating for us as players. We’re not in the front office. We don’t make the decisions, and we don’t have to write the checks. But we’re getting to the point on our team where we’re supposed to wait it out, wait for the young guys, start doing some things and start making some moves. Not only are we ready for that, I think the fans are, as well. We’ve trusted the front office, and we still trust them. But we want to best possible team on the field … We’ve trusted their plan the whole time, and now it’s getting to that point where it’s time to do some things. We know we have a good young team, but we need a few pieces. Obviously, you’re not going to do all that in one season, but you can add a piece here and add a piece there.”

You can’t sign everyone, but I can’t for the life of me see why the Nats weren’t more interested in keeping Adam Dunn.  He seemed totally amenable to an extension last summer, and it would have been cheaper than the $56 million he’s taking from the Sox. Olney says that he may have gone three-years, $30 million.  Even if it was a bit higher, that’s still a bargain. At the very least they could have dealt him at the deadline and gotten some value for him.

Instead he’s walking for picks and the star young slugger is openly questioning the direction of the team. Just remember this when Zimmerman leaves via free agency in a couple of years and the Nats wonder why he won’t engage them in serious negotiations.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”