Red Sox expected to non-tender reliever Hideki Okajima

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Boston is expected to non-tender reliever Hideki Okajima before tonight’s deadline, according to Gordon Edes of ESPNBoston.com.

Okajima proved to be an excellent investment for the Red Sox, who signed him out of Japan in November of 2006 for just $2.5 million. He quickly emerged as one of the league’s top setup men, going 12-4 with a 2.72 ERA and 176/62 K/BB ratio in 192 innings from 2007-2009.

He struggled mightily for most of this year and entered August with a 5.73 ERA, but allowed just two runs in his final 16 appearances to finish with a respectable 4.50 mark in 46 innings overall.

Okajima also managed to turn the Boston media completely against him by often refusing to speak to them following poor outings. Along those lines, this morning Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe–who has been one of Okajima’s harshest critics, to say the least–called his rumored non-tendering “addition by subtraction.”

He still looks capable of being a solid setup man, but getting out of Boston is probably best for Okajima at this point and it’s tough to blame the Red Sox for cutting bait rather than paying him approximately $3.5 million in 2011.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.