Shaughnessy: The Red Sox should give Jeter $60 million

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Last week a few people had some fun on Twitter suggesting that the Red Sox — in the interests of promoting chaos — should make Jeter an offer. Pete Abraham mentioned it. I did. Some others too.  It was mildly chuckle-worthy during a slow week. Today, however, Dan Shaugnessy shows us that not every little clever zinger on Twitter is worthy of its own column:

There is simply no downside to making Jeter a massive offer. In the worst-case scenario he calls your bluff and you get the Yankees captain. I don’t care if Jeter is way past his prime or if the Sox would have to wildly overpay a player of his diminished skills.

I say offer him the world. Forget about Jayson Werth. Blow Jeter away with dollars and years. At worst this would just mean the Sox would jack up the final price the Yankees must pay. It could be sort of like Mark Teixeira-in-reverse. And if Jeter actually signed with Boston, the damage to the Yankees’ psyche would be inestimable.

Shaughnessy says the Sox should offer Jeter three years at $20 million per.  And I think he’s quite serious. $60 million to “damage the Yankees’ psyche.”  No discussion whatsoever of what having Derek Jeter as the starting shortstop at that salary would mean to, you know, the competitive position of the Red Sox for the next three years. No apparent understanding that, unlike Shaughnessy himself, the people who run the Red Sox these days don’t think of the world as an epic Yankees-Red Sox battle in which sense and reason is discarded. No actual baseball analysis at all.  It’s pure red meat for the “screw the Yankees” crowd.

Which is fine on some level because I know this is sports, and sports shouldn’t always be sober and serious.  But this is the sort of thing that you have to keep in mind when Shaughnessy and others who peddle this stuff turn around and demand that they themselves be taken seriously.

Albert Pujols hit his 597th career home run

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Angels DH Albert Pujols smacked his 597th career home run, a two-run shot in the top of the first inning during Wednesday night’s 5-2 loss to the Rays. The blast was off of Erasmo Ramirez and marked No. 6 on the season for the future Hall of Famer.

Pujols finished 1-for-3 with the homer and a walk. After Wednesday’s game, he’s hitting a lackluster .244/.296/.378 with 34 RBI and 14 runs scored in 186 trips to the plate.

Pujols currently ranks ninth on baseball’s all-time leaderboard and is three shy of joining the 600-homer club. He’s currently 13 home runs away from tying Sammy Sosa for eighth all-time.

Chris Sale’s streak of starts with at least 10 strikeouts ends

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Red Sox starter Chris Sale entered Wednesday’s outing against the Rangers with at least 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive starts, tying a record he already shared with Pedro Martinez. He failed do break the record, racking up only six strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings. Fortunately, the Red Sox scored seven runs in the bottom of the seventh to put him in line for the win. Sale gave up four runs (three earned) on six hits and a walk.

After Wednesday’s outing, Sale is sitting on a 2.34 ERA with a 101/14 K/BB ratio in 73 innings. So far, so good for the Red Sox, who acquired Sale from the White Sox in December.

Sale previously racked up 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive games between May 23 and June 30 in 2015 with the White Sox. Pedro Martinez accomplished the feat for the Red Sox between August 19 and September 27 in 1999.