Marvin Miller

Marvin Miller sets the record straight on Jim Palmer and the union

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A couple of weeks ago Maury Chass and some others wrote about Marvin Miller’s Hall of Fame candidacy which, regrettably, has yet to be successful.  Chass made mention of Miller’s recent pessimism regarding his chances, and quoted Miller dismissing the makeup of the Veteran’s Committee in whose hands his Hall of Fame case currently rests. Specifically, Chass quoted Miller talking about Jim Palmer. You can read the details of that here and here.

Yesterday I received an email from Marvin Miller’s son, Peter Miller.  Peter explained that his father doesn’t use a computer, and that he’s just now reading printouts of some of the things that were written regarding the Palmer comments.  He passed along a statement from Marvin Miller, which he asked to be published (see below). He also gave me Marvin Miller’s phone number so that I could confirm it all.  Anyone who has any journalism training knows that you have to make that call. I have no journalism training. But I made the call anyway because Marvin Miller is a personal hero, and there was no way I wasn’t going to talk to him when given the chance.

I am happy to report that most of our conversation was off the record. Happy because that meant that Miller was candid and fun and still sharp at age 93, and the 20 minutes I spent on the phone with him is easily one of the highlights of my adult life.  No, he didn’t dish dirt — that wasn’t the point — but he shared a lot. Among the topics: the makeup of the Hall of Fame and his candidacy. His family. His legacy. The difficulty of writing a book, due to all of the time alone it requires. Curt Flood. Lawyer stuff. Bowie Kuhn. Some other things.

The biggest overall takeaway from the conversation: the the extent Miller is ever portrayed as bitter or angry or crotchety about not having been elected to the Hall of Fame, it is an inaccurate portrayal. He is conflicted, yes, and understandably so, but he struck me as someone quite comfortable with his legacy as it is, thank you, and views the matter with wry amusement more than anything else. At least he did this morning.

The biggest factual takeaway was an observation he made relating to union dynamics. Unlike most unions, where the real push for formation and early activism comes from the have-nots in the ranks, the baseball union was always strongly supported by players at the top. This kind of surprised me because you often hear anecdotes about so-and-so star player didn’t see the point because he was already making six figures and getting endorsements. Those, however, were the exceptions, not the rule.

Which brings us back to Palmer.  Miller said that his conversation with Chass that led to the anti-Palmer quote was premised on a misunderstanding and maybe a misstatement or two that came in the course of a wide-ranging conversation.  Here is his official statement on the matter:

“From the beginning of the Major League Baseball Players Association in 1966, and continuing throughout his entire outstanding pitching career, Jim Palmer was a voluntary, supportive, dues-paying member of the union, during a period which included the strikes of 1972 and 1981.

“My references to Jim Palmer were confused with my descriptions of the substitutions made this year in the management section of the Hall of Fame’s voting committee. I doubt if anyone would quarrel with the description of Jerry Reinsdorf, who is new to the committee this year, as anti-union. He wears that badge proudly.

“The clue to the inaccuracy is in the reference to Jim Palmer’s role in 1969. I am well aware there was no strike in 1969, so there could have been no reference to crossing a picket line in that year. I am also well aware that Jim was on the disabled list when the 1969 season started and had been on that list for more than two years. So he could not have been talking about going past a non-existent picket line.”

Thanks to Peter Miller for passing it along. And thanks to Marvin Miller for sharing a bit of his Monday morning with me. I appreciate that he’s conflicted about it all, and I assume that, once again, the Veteran’s Committee will pass him over. But personally speaking, I hope Marvin Miller is elected to the Hall of Fame this year. Without him, Cooperstown’s status as the keeper of baseball history is laughable.

Video: Minor League Manager goes on epic rant

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Frisco RoughRiders manager Joe Mikulik got his money’s worth last night. He was ejected after arguing an automatic double play on an enforcement of the slide rule, and he didn’t go gently into that goodnight.

Rather, he threw things, kicked things, threw things and then subsequently kicked those same things, gave overly-demonstrative slides and safe signs and basically went all Earl Weaver/Lou Piniella on everyone.

Double-A baseball is the best minor league because you tend to see more prospects there than you do at Triple-A. But it’s also the best because, when you’re a manager who is not quite a heartbeat away from getting your shot at the big leagues, you’re a little less uptight about things. Or at least Mikulik was. Or maybe he was more uptight. I don’t know. He just went with it, and going with it has its charms.

 

(h/t Big League Stew)

A must-read oral history of the 1998 home run chase

7 Jul 1998:   American Leaguer player Mark McGwire #25 of the St Louis Cardinals and Sammy Sosa #21 of  the Chicago Cubs answer questions during  the Major League Baseball All-Star Game at Coors Field in Denver,  Colorado.The American  League defeated the
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It’s hard to believe that it’s been 18 years since Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa captivated the nation with their epic chase of Roger Maris’ home run record. But it has been, and after years of reaction, counter-reaction and, of course, baseball’s reckoning with the performance-enhancing drugs which helped fuel the chase, it’s probably finally time to do our best to contextualize it historically.

Today one of my favorite news outlets does that with an oral history. All of the key figures weigh-in on it, from McGwire and Sosa to Bud Selig to Tony La Russa. Randy Johnson makes an appearance as well, reminding us that it wasn’t just the sluggers who had an amazing year in 1998. Indeed, his story, including his being traded to Houston and going on an amazing second-half run, has almost been lost to history.

This is bookmark material, my friends. For savoring later if you can’t read it now. And for revisiting at another time given the depths to the drama which justifies multiple readings. I’ll just warn you that there is some adult language in the story, but that’s to be expected given the passion the 1998 baseball season inspired.

Go check it out.

UPDATE: Asdrubal Cabrera leaves Mets-Nats game with back spasms

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - MAY 12:  Shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera #13 of the New York Mets throws to first from his knee after diving to catch a ground ball to get Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers for the second out of the sixth inning at Dodger Stadium on May 12, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  The Dodgers won 5-0.  (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
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UPDATE: Cabrera was removed from the game due to back spasms.

1:21PM: This is not good: Asdrubal Cabrera was removed from today’s game against the Nationals with an apparent injury.

It’s unclear what the injury was, as Cabrera had yet to even play in the game. Matt Reynolds came on to play shortstop in the bottom of the first inning, but Cabrera didn’t bat in the top of the first. It could be an illness. Or some freak occurrence.

We’ll update when we hear more.

There are apparently unwritten rules about manager replay challenges now

CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 05: Manager Joe Maddon #70 of the Chicago Cubs shakes hands with manager Mike Matheny #26 of the St. Louis Cardinals before the Opening Night game at Wrigley Field on April 5, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Last night’s Cardinals-Cubs game was a blowout, with the Cubs beating the Cards 12-3. Apparently, however, in the ninth inning of the game, Reynoldsburg, Ohio’s own Mike Matheny played the Cardinals infield in, which is a move you never see in a blowout. Why did he do that?

He hasn’t said yet, but Cubs manager Joe Maddon just spoke to the media before today’s game and he’s speculating that Matheny did it as a form of protest:

God, I hope that’s true. I hope that manager replay challenges, which are already dumb enough inasmuch as they turn what should be an officiating correction device into a strategic tool, are now turning into another front in the Great Unwritten Rules Wars. I hope that we now have a bunch of people talking about how there’s a right way and a wrong way to use the replay system and that one can disrespect the other side if they do it the wrong way. The way the replay system has been implemented often resembles tragedy. Why not make it farce?

Oh well, I guess it beats throwing at someone for doing that wrong. And I guess it’s just a reminder that no matter what we do, baseball is always gonna give us an opportunity for petty bits of silliness.