The Dodgers sign Jon Garland to a one year, $5 million deal with an option

2 Comments

Dylan Hernandez of the L.A. Times reports that the Dodgers have agreed to a contract with Jon Garland.  It’s a one year deal for $5 million with $3 million in potential bonuses and a vesting option for a second year if he reaches 190 innings. Given Garland’s durability, he’s probably a safe bet to reach the option benchmark. It’s unclear what will trigger the bonuses.

Garland is probably best described as an innings eater. Yes, he was 14-12 with a 3.47 ERA last season, but that was in the best pitcher’s park in baseball.  He’ll still be pitching in a good pitchers’ park, but not quite as good. He also was pretty hit lucky last year, and he could see his luck decrease a bit going forward.  All of that said, the Dodgers would have killed for that kind of dependable production in the rotation last season, and unless this is a massive overpay, it’s probably a pretty good signing for L.A.

It’s also great for the Padres, by the way, because with Garland cashing in on his one year in Petco, you can bet that San Diego will only continue to be a place where starters will go cheap in order to build up their value.  If the Padres are smart, they can really play that to their advantage.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
6 Comments

Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

*

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.