Boras dismisses the Salcedo loan as a non-issue

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Scott Boras went on MLB Network Radio on SIRIUS XM this afternoon and spoke with hosts Jim Duquette and Kevin Kennedy about the Edward Salcedo loan story, which we’ve been following since yesterday. Boras had three main points he wanted to make:

  • While everyone’s ears prick up when they hear about agents loaning money to kids, that is a function of U.S. audiences hearing about it in the context of the NCAA and amateurism rules and finding it distasteful and wrong.  It is wrong in the latter context, Boras, agrees, but not the former.  He believes that the New York Times story was written because it hits on the latter, hot button issues. Oh, and because people are very eager to “finally get to attack someone we want to.”  Meaning himself, of course;
  • Salcedo was poor and in need, and that if it weren’t for the loans — and he stressed that it was a “loans,” over time, not one check for $70,000 — Salcedo would have had to abandon his baseball career due to financial need; and
  • No MLBPA rules were violated in making the loans.

I still think that the agenda involved as a lot to do with Major League Baseball’s designs on restraining the market in the Dominican, but I’ll concede that Boras’ answer is more satisfying on an Occam’s Razor level. The Times does likely have an interest in getting in on the “agents loaning young players money” story even if, in this case, there is nothing wrong with it.  People do like to take swings at Boras if they get a chance.  Of course, the paper isn’t doing this on its own. It quoted some Major League Baseball sources pretty prominently in yesterday’s piece, so my theory could be working right alongside Boras’.

I have yet to see a statement from the MLBPA blessing the loans, so there may still be an issue here with respect to technical compliance. But at the same time, I have yet to see anything that suggests that this is a dire problem like it was portrayed to be in yesterday’s New York Times story.

Steven Matz likely to start season on DL; Zack Wheeler to adhere to innings limit

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Mets manager Terry Collins said on Wednesday, “It’s unlikely that [Steven Matz] will start the season with us.” The final spot in the Mets’ starting rotation will go to either Zack Wheeler or Seth Lugo, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports.

On Wheeler’s innings limit, assistant GM John Ricco said, “There’s going to be some number but we don’t exactly know what that is.” Wheeler missed the last two seasons after undergoing Tommy John surgery.

Neither Wheeler nor Lugo have had terrific springs as each carries a 5.11 and 5.56 Grapefruit League ERA, respectively. However, Carig notes that Wheeler has impressed simply by appearing healthy and brandishing a fastball that once again sits in the mid- to high-90’s. Lugo, meanwhile, proved crucial to the Mets last year, posting a 2.67 ERA across eight starts and nine relief appearances.

Rockies sign 30-year lease to stay in Coors Field

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Nick Groke of the Denver Post reports that the Rockies agreed to a $200 million, 30-year lease with the Metropolitan Baseball Stadium District, which is the state division that owns Coors Field. As part of the deal, the Rockies will lease and develop a plot of land south of the stadium, which will cost the team $125 million for 99 years.

As Groke points out, had the Rockies not reached a deal by Thursday, March 30, the lease would have rolled over for five more years.

Rockies owner Dick Monfort issued a statement, saying, “We are proud that Coors Field will continue to be a vital part of a vibrant city, drawing fans from near and far and making our Colorado residents proud.”

The Rockies moved into Coors Field in 1995. It is the National League’s third oldest stadium. In that span of time, the Rockies have made the playoffs three times, the last coming in 2009 when they lost in the NLDS to the Phillies. The Rockies were swept in the 2007 World Series by the Red Sox.