Jesse Litsch, Chris Iannetta

Red Sox could look to Iannetta, Napoli with Victor gone

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While the Red Sox made noises about viewing Victor Martinez’s return as a priority, they didn’t get very aggressive with their offers, suggesting that they were prepared to lose him all along. 

In the big picture, that makes sense.  Martinez is a subpar defensive catcher who won’t be getting any better in his mid-30s.   The Tigers will have the option of using him primarily as a DH in the second half of his deal, so maybe it will work out for them.  The Red Sox, though, weren’t interested in paying $12.5 million apiece for his age 34 and 35 seasons.

And if the Red Sox were going to lose Martinez, this was probably the best-case scenario.  The Tigers “lost” a tiebreaker with the A’s at season’s end and thus have the earliest pick in the first round that’s not protected.  If the Tigers had finished 80-82, they would have kept their first-rounder no matter how many free agents they signed this winter.  Since they went 81-81, they’ll lose their first pick, the 19th overall selection*, and it will go to Boston unless the Tigers sign Jayson Werth, Cliff Lee, Mariano Rivera or Rafael Soriano.

(*The Tigers had the 16th best record, but three teams in the top half of the first round are getting compensation picks for failing to sign their selections last summer.)

Martinez’s loss leaves the Red Sox with Jarrod Saltalamacchia and not much else at catcher.  The team was linked with fellow free agent John Buck, but it’s doubtful there was serious interest now, at least not at the kind of dollars he ended up getting from Florida.  A.J. Pierzynski and Miguel Olivo are still out there in free agency, but the Red Sox will probably look to the trade market if they’re going to upgrade from Salty.

The Red Sox have been linked to Iannetta for about a year and a half now, and rumor had the Rockies turning down an offer of Jed Lowrie for him before the trade deadline last season.  Boston would surely prefer to hang on to Lowrie after his strong second half, but a deal involving the two players would still make a lot of sense.  Iannetta doesn’t hit for average, but he’s gotten on base 35 percent of the time in his young career and hit 49 homers in 1,084 at-bats.

Napoli would probably come cheaper.  He’s a weaker defender than Iannetta, but he has basically the same career OPS as Martinez.  Last season, he hit 26 homers in 453 at-bats while splitting time pretty evenly between catcher and first base.   He’s due about $5 million in arbitration, and given Mike Scioscia’s preference for strong defensive catchers, the Angels might be ready to move on.

One more possibility is Russell Martin.  The former All-Star could be non-tendered by the Dodgers after hitting .248/.347/.332 in 331 at-bats during a 2010 season cut short by injury.  He’s declined defensively as well, but at 28, it’d be worth gambling a few million dollars on his ability to rebound.

If the price is right, I expect the Red Sox to come away with one of the trio.  If not, then they could well stick with Salty as their starting catcher and re-sign Jason Varitek or bring in Gregg Zaun as a backup.  They could always reverse course and trade for a veteran over the summer if it doesn’t work out.

James McCann is in The Best Shape of His Life

Detroit Tigers catcher James McCann blows a bubble while warming up during a spring training baseball workout, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, in Lakeland, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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As I note every spring, “Best Shape of His Life” stories aren’t really about players being in The Best Shape of Their Lives. They’re about players and agents seeking to create positive stories.

We know this because the vast majority of Best Shape of His Life claims are about guys who were either injured the season before, guys who had subpar years the season before or players whose conditioning was a point of controversy the season before. These folks, or their agents + reporters who have little if nothing to write about in the offseason = BSOHL.

James McCann hurt his ankle last season and had a subpar year at the plate. So not only is he a perfect BSOHL candidate, he went old school with the claim and hit it right on the money, verbatim:

Spring training is less than a month away, folks!

Bo Jackson is not gonna change kids’ minds

1989:  Bo Jackson #16 of the Kansas City Royals practices his swing as he prepares to bat during a game in the 1989 season.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Last week Bo Jackson said that, if he had it to do all over again, he would have never played professional football and that he would never let his kids play. The sport is too violent, he said. “I’d tell them, ‘Play baseball, basketball, soccer, golf, just anything but football.’”

Fair enough. Thom Loverro of the Washington Times, however, thinks that Bo could do more than simply give his opinion on the matter. He thinks Bo should become an official ambassador for Major League Baseball:

Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred, pick up the phone right now and call Bo Jackson. Tell him you have a job for him — vice president of something, whatever you would call the man in charge of converting a generation of young athletes to baseball. And pay him what he wants.

You won’t find a better symbol of the differences between the two sports than Bo Jackson. After all, he was an All-Star in both. Bo knows football. Bo knows baseball.

Bo, tell the children — baseball over football.

The Children: “Who is Bo Jackson?”

Yeah, I’m being a bit flip here, but dude: Jackson is 54 years-old. He last played baseball 23 years ago. I’d personally run through a wall for Bo Jackson, but I’m 43. I was 12 when he won the Heisman trophy. While he may loom large to middle aged sports writers, a teenager contemplating what sport to play is not going to listen to someone a decade or more older than his parents.

This isn’t terribly important in the grand scheme of things, but it’s indicative of how most columnists process the world through their own experiences and assume they apply universally. It’s probably the biggest trap most sports opinion folks fall into.