NLCS Giants Phillies Baseball

Ryan Howard got a second place MVP vote. That actually happened.

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It has become ritual for we blogger-types to scan the awards ballots to find the oddities, outliers and outrages of the BBWAA vote, so I dutifully do so now.  No real outrages here.  Any reasonable person figured that Votto, Pujols and maybe — maybe — Carlos Gonzalez were your huckleberries, and they finished 1-2-3.  So to the extent there is any reason to complain here it’s of the “downballot snarking” variety, not the “this is outrageous!” variety. To wit:

  • Ryan Howard got a second place vote, a third place vote a fourth, two fifths, two sixths and a seventh. He’s a poor defensive first baseman who ranked 17th in OPS, yet he beat out Buster Posey on the ballot.  I know he’s a popular player and everything — and I would never say that he’s not a good player — but is there a player in the league for whom there is a greater disconnect between perceived value and actual value?
  • Roy Halladay was sixth. I haven’t thought hard about it, but it sort of feels right.  He didn’t have a case or anything, but I want voters to get back to seriously considering pitchers for the MVP.  There will come a season soon when someone goes, like 24-4 with 300 strikeouts and a low walk total. When he does, I want that guy to win the MVP.
  • Ubaldo Jimenez got a fourth place vote, but no other votes.  No man is an island. Except, that is, for the man who voted Jimenez fourth.
  • Dan Uggla got five votes. I can now officially taunt Marlins fans by saying that the Braves traded Omar Infante and Mike Dunn for an MVP candidate.  Wait, that’s silly. There aren’t any Marlins fans.
  • Deep thought: how can Omar Infante beat Joey Votto onto the All-Star team and not be considered more valuable?!  It’s the All-Star game, people!!
  • Adrian Gonzalez was the highest ranked player who got left off of someone’s ballot.  Voters can pick their top ten. I don’t believe that voters have to vote for ten players, however, so that could explain it. I mean, if a voter figured “top three is all that matters”  it makes sense to leave him off. But if the guy who left off Gonazalez actually voted for ten other dudes, that seems a bit nuts to me. UPDATE: reader Whitakk points out that there were 32 10th-place votes cast, so each voter must have turned in a complete ballot.  So someone didn’t think Gonzalez was top-10 material.  Odd.

Like I said: no basis whatsoever for outrage. Votto deserved it in my view, and there were no atrocities on the ballots.  But it’s fun to talk about it all the same, so we talk.

Gary Sanchez hits 20th homer, ties 86-year-old record

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 26: Gary Sanchez #24 of the New York Yankees rounds first base on a 2-RBI double during the second inning against the Baltimore Orioles at Yankee Stadium on August 26, 2016 in the Bronx borough of New York City. (Photo by Adam Hunger/Getty Images)
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Yankees catcher Gary Sanchez blasted a two-run home run off of Red Sox starter David Price in the bottom of the first inning of Tuesday night’s game. It’s his 20th homer of the season, tying a record held by Wally Berger for the fastest to 20 homers, per MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch. Both did so in 51 career games. Berger did so with the Boston Braves in 1930.

Sanchez came into Tuesday’s game hitting a ridiculous .315/.388/.690 with 19 home runs and 40 RBI in 209 plate appearances. He’s a big reason why the Yankees are still in contention for the American League Wild Card despite selling at the trade deadline.

Video: Sen. Marco Rubio pays his respects to Jose Fernandez

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 29:  Florida Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) is seen as he stops to thank volunteers at a phone bank on the final day before the Florida primary election on August 29, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Rubio is facing off against Carlos Beruff for the Republican primary.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) paid tribute to late Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez by recounting his life story and explaining the impact the right-hander had on his family, his community, and baseball fans.

No matter your politics, we can all recognize Rubio’s tribute to Fernandez as heartfelt and true.