Did “bullies” give the Cy Young Award to Felix Hernandez?

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Murray Chass spoke with Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune about the American League Cy Young Award results. Rogers, who voted for David Price, wondered about the outcome:

“I wonder how much of it was bullying on the Internet. There were a lot of columns written in September saying no one should be stupid enough not to vote for Felix. Maybe that’s what happened, but I hope not.”

To which I respond: if a given writer is so spineless and unsure of himself and his analysis of baseball that he’d actually vote for someone whom he did not think was deserving simply because some other writers said he shouldn’t, he should have his voting privileges taken away.  But personally, I don’t think such a beast exists. I don’t agree with every baseball writer I’ve ever met, but I’ve never met one who I thought could be bullied like that. They can be persuaded, of course, because they’re mostly reasonable people. But bullied? Please.  I’d be curious to hear which of his colleagues Rogers thinks doesn’t have the courage of his convictions.

But Rogers wasn’t the only one who told Chass that he thinks his colleagues are incapable of doing their jobs. Here’s Tracy Ringolsby, offering his opinion of Hernandez’s win:

“It’s the trendy thing to do, and everybody wants to be part of the trend.”

So there you have it. Two of the longest tenured and most respected baseball writers in the business think that the BBWAA voting pool is full of wimpy sheep, cowed into voting for Felix Hernandez by the intimidating style-mavens of the sabermetric set.

How the stat guys got so tough and trendy while eating Hot Pockets in their mothers’ basements is an open question.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.