Did “bullies” give the Cy Young Award to Felix Hernandez?

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Murray Chass spoke with Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune about the American League Cy Young Award results. Rogers, who voted for David Price, wondered about the outcome:

“I wonder how much of it was bullying on the Internet. There were a lot of columns written in September saying no one should be stupid enough not to vote for Felix. Maybe that’s what happened, but I hope not.”

To which I respond: if a given writer is so spineless and unsure of himself and his analysis of baseball that he’d actually vote for someone whom he did not think was deserving simply because some other writers said he shouldn’t, he should have his voting privileges taken away.  But personally, I don’t think such a beast exists. I don’t agree with every baseball writer I’ve ever met, but I’ve never met one who I thought could be bullied like that. They can be persuaded, of course, because they’re mostly reasonable people. But bullied? Please.  I’d be curious to hear which of his colleagues Rogers thinks doesn’t have the courage of his convictions.

But Rogers wasn’t the only one who told Chass that he thinks his colleagues are incapable of doing their jobs. Here’s Tracy Ringolsby, offering his opinion of Hernandez’s win:

“It’s the trendy thing to do, and everybody wants to be part of the trend.”

So there you have it. Two of the longest tenured and most respected baseball writers in the business think that the BBWAA voting pool is full of wimpy sheep, cowed into voting for Felix Hernandez by the intimidating style-mavens of the sabermetric set.

How the stat guys got so tough and trendy while eating Hot Pockets in their mothers’ basements is an open question.

Royals closer Kelvin Herrera leaves with forearm tightness

Associated Press
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The Royals are a game and a half out of the crazy AL Wild Card race — six games back of the Indians in the division — so they don’t have a huge margin for error. They got some bad news last night, though, that could have a major impact on their playoff hopes: closer Kelvin Herrera experienced tightness in his right forearm in the ninth inning of last night’s win, forcing him out of the game.

Herrera walked the bases loaded, then went to a 2-0 count on the next batter before leaving the game. That last pitch was a fastball that clocked in at 91 m.p.h., which is NOT a typical Kelvin Herrera fastball.  Herrera didn’t talk after the game but his teammate Sal Perez said that Herrera told him  “I’m tight. I don’t feel my forearm.”

Reporters left the clubhouse before an official diagnosis or prognosis could be delivered, so expect an update some time today. If Herrera is out the closer duties could fall to Scott Alexander or Brandon Maurer.

Albert Pujols sets the all-time record for home runs by a foreign-born player

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Albert Pujols had a big night last night, driving in four runs as the Angels beat the Rangers 10-1. Three of those runs came on a three-run homer. That was the 610th home run of Pujols’ career, snapping a tie for eighth on the all-time list with Sammy Sosa. It also made him baseball’s all-time leader for home runs by a player born outside the U.S.

Pujols was aware of the accomplishment, of course, and noted how honored he was after the game:

”It’s pretty special. Obviously, all the great players from the Dominican Republic, Latin America, Venezuela, Mexico, Colombia, they’ve gone through the big leagues and to be able to accomplish something like this is very humbling.”

After Sosa, who is from the Dominican Republic, comes Rafael Palmeiro (569); Manny Ramirez (555); David Ortiz (541); Carlos Delgado (473); Jose Canseco (462); Adrian Beltre and Miguel Cabrera (459).