Brewers, Nats are “out in front” on Carl Pavano

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I spent this morning at the doctor’s office getting my annual checkup.  First one since, like, 2003, so I should probably look up the term “annual.”  In any event it went well.  When my doctor asked me if I’m still practicing law I told him no, that I was a baseball blogger.  I got the same response I normally get when I say that: “really?”  That’s combined with a face that basically says “that’s a job?”  Alas.  He was nice, though: as soon as he said that he asked me if I’ve ever seen “that PBS documentary about baseball.  The one with all of the old footage in it. Kind of goes over the whole history?”  I’m beginning to suspect that my doctor isn’t the biggest baseball fan.

Anyway: back to the grind:

Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe tells us that the Brewers and Nationals are “out in front” in the “Carl Pavano sweepstakes.” Just like I can tell what my doctor’s facial expressions mean, I can detect tone from certain tweets, and I think Mr. Cafardo is being sarcastic in calling this a “sweepstakes.”

Not that Pavano wouldn’t be a prize. Especially for the Brewers, whose starting pitching was a freakin’ train wreck last season.  Pavano would be a nice addition. Between that and the Brewers deciding that they’re going to keep Prince Fielder, one gets the sense that they’re really going to try and go for it next year.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: