Yankees not interested in Leo Mazzone as pitching coach

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Leo Mazzone said last month that he’d like to be the Yankees’ or Mets’ pitching coach, calling both openings “a great job.”

However, according to Chad Jennings of the New York Journal News general manager Brian Cashman “has no plans of meeting with Mazzone, who turned down the Yankees job before Ron Guidry was hired.”

Guidry was hired in 2006, which is when Mazzone left the Braves to become the Orioles’ pitching coach under friend and manager Sam Perlozzo.

At the time Mazzone was coming off an incredible run of success in Atlanta and some people were talking about him as a possible Hall of Famer, so it makes sense that the Yankees pursued him and also makes sense that Cashman still holds a grudge that they were turned down for another AL East team.

Mazzone’s legacy has taken a big hit since then, as he failed to turn the Orioles’ pitching staff around before being fired in 2007 with a year remaining on his contract and has received little interest from teams since then. Given the way pitching coaches are hired, fired, and recycled every season, the fact that Mazzone wants another gig and can’t find one seems odd and seemingly speaks to teams viewing what he did in Atlanta as overrated or his being extremely difficult to deal with.

Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

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Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.