The Ricketts Family: government spending is horrible unless it benefits the Cubs

35 Comments

We’ve noted how the Ricketts Family is all about getting the government to help them out with the Cubs, be it financing their new spring training complex in Arizona or paying for renovations to their ballpark in Illinois. Par for the course as far as baseball owners go. Those guys are always at the public trough.

But I wasn’t aware until this morning — thanks to a post over at Windy City Watch — that Joe Ricketts, the patriarch of the Ricketts family, is the founder and primary funding source for a political outfit with the sole purpose of limiting wasteful government spending. Check out his video here, in which he talks about how he left the Democratic Party back in the 60s because LBJ spent too much money.  Guess it doesn’t count when the money is being used to benefit billionaires and their businesses.

But that’s just a cynical reaction on my part.  I’m sure the Rickettses can explain to me how those positions jibe together. And I’ll give them the opportunity: I’m going to call both Ricketts’ group — Taxpayers Against Earmarks — and the Chicago Cubs and ask them if they see any inconsistencies between their patriarch’s political activism and their seemingly insatiable hunger for public money. I’ll let you know what I hear.

Will Middlebrooks carted off field with left ankle injury

Getty Images
3 Comments

Phillies third baseman Will Middlebrooks suffered a serious injury during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Orioles. The infielder was chasing down a pop fly in the eighth inning when he ran into left fielder Andrew Pullin, who inadvertently trapped Middlebrooks’ ankle under his leg. Middlebrooks was unable to put weight on his leg following the collision and was carted off the field and taken to a local hospital for X-rays.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, not much is known yet about the severity of the ankle injury or the recovery time it will require, though it appears serious enough to set Middlebrooks back considerably as he seeks a backup/bench role with the team this spring.

The 29-year-old is currently seeking another opportunity to extend his six-year major-league career in 2018. He’s coming off of two down years with the Brewers and Rangers, during which he slashed a cumulative .169/.229/.262 with four extra bases through 70 plate appearances.