The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim


The Best: for a team that has been all over the place in terms of their geographic identify, they’ve generally been steady on their sartorial identity.  The red and white with the navy accents is a good look. The capital “A” with the halo is pretty inspired too.  They’re not awful now, but they wear vests and solid jerseys and do all kinds of trendy things that I just don’t care for. I prefer the Nolan Ryan/Bobby Grich era with the dark hats with the red bills. Take off the elastic waist bands and slap some buttons on those babies, and they’d look pretty sharp. The 1966-71 look is close, but I prefer the upper-case “A.”

The Worst: This atrocity is up there with the worst things the Athletics and the Diamondbacks ever wore. Maybe it’s not as assaulting as those, but it’s just wrong on so many levels. Like each component part — the vest, the pinstripes, the colors, the logo — were each designed by a different department of some giant corporation.  Which, in all fairness, they were.

Assessment: No, I’m not being too hard on those pinstriped things simply because Mo Vaughn looked awful in them. Even Jim Edmonds and Tim Salmon looked like butt in those things.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.