The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Minnesota Twins

7 Comments

The Best: They were unchanged — and looking good — from 1960 through 1971 before moving on to the land of the double knits.  Which still didn’t look horrible, although they were a bit generic. The best look was that classic look, which is nicely reproduced in the new home alternates. I like the new roadies better than the actual classics, though, thanks to the “Minnesota” on them as opposed to “Twins.”

The WorstThe World Series years pinstripes with the M on the hats. I know they have their fans — especially any Twins backer under the age of 40 or so — but this is a personal, visceral thing for me. Men wearing those things knocked Alan Trammell and the Tigers out of the 1987 playoffs. Men wearing those things picked up and threw the 1991 Braves out of the World Series. Seeing them causes me pain, and that’s without accounting for the fact that pinstripes on gray uniforms look terrible and that no team has ever in its history eschewed an epic logo like those 80s and 90s Twins teams eschewed the interlocking “TC.” That “M” cap they had for so long would be like the Yankees getting rid of their “NY” for a big block N.

Assessment: The Twins are living proof that the uniform a team wears during its greatest success is not necessarily its best uniform.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

Getty Images
1 Comment

Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.