The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Minnesota Twins

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The Best: They were unchanged — and looking good — from 1960 through 1971 before moving on to the land of the double knits.  Which still didn’t look horrible, although they were a bit generic. The best look was that classic look, which is nicely reproduced in the new home alternates. I like the new roadies better than the actual classics, though, thanks to the “Minnesota” on them as opposed to “Twins.”

The WorstThe World Series years pinstripes with the M on the hats. I know they have their fans — especially any Twins backer under the age of 40 or so — but this is a personal, visceral thing for me. Men wearing those things knocked Alan Trammell and the Tigers out of the 1987 playoffs. Men wearing those things picked up and threw the 1991 Braves out of the World Series. Seeing them causes me pain, and that’s without accounting for the fact that pinstripes on gray uniforms look terrible and that no team has ever in its history eschewed an epic logo like those 80s and 90s Twins teams eschewed the interlocking “TC.” That “M” cap they had for so long would be like the Yankees getting rid of their “NY” for a big block N.

Assessment: The Twins are living proof that the uniform a team wears during its greatest success is not necessarily its best uniform.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.