The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Detroit Tigers

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The Best: As if there was any question. It looks good in any decade, and on any body type. Well, almost any body type. The whites seem brighter than any other team’s whites. The English D is perfection. It’s the perfect shade of blue. A hair darker than navy, it seems, even if it’s called navy. Aside from one crazy “what in the hell were they thinking?” year in1960, the Tigers have stuck with that look since 1934 (though the English D was in use as early as 1904).  With apologies to the Yankees and the Dodgers, this is the best uniform in baseball history.

The Worst: Putting an actual tiger on the back is a bit audacious. Pinstripes are just not right on the Tigers, but they do at least help show why I like their current look better than the Yankees. And I don’t care if it was 1903 and they were still trying to figure things out: a block D on Red was a sartorial dead end. But the all time worst, however, has to be the mid-90s orange-bill cap numbers. They looked like a USFL team in them.

Assessment: I already called them the best, so let’s dispose of an assessment here and talk about road uniforms for a minute. Personally speaking I like their doubleknit roadies of the 70s and 80s, probably because I grew up with them. Hardly anyone agrees with me on this, even Tigers fans who are my age. Even when I point out that they improved them at the very end, getting rid of the pullover, elastic waistband version, slapping a belt and buttons on them and taking them out of that 70s look. Downright sharp if you ask me. But still, people disagree with me. They like the current roadies the best, almost unanimously. They’re nice enough, but bah! Bah, I say!  I put them third, behind both the Alan Trammell-era grays and the 1960s number-on-the-sleeve jobbies, which I find totally cool for some reason.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.