Kirk Gibson’s 1988 home run bat sells for $575,912

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I can’t believe what I just saw!

Is it just me, or does over half a million bucks for a bat from 1988 seem excessive? Because that’s what the bat Kirk Gibson used to hit his famous walkoff homer in the 1988 World Series went for last night.  $575,912 to be exact.  Other items sold: the batting helmet he wore ($153,388.80), his MVP award ($110,293.20), his World Series trophy ($45,578.40) and his World Series road uniform ($9,664.80).

I was unaware that players got their own World Series trophy. I also find it neat that someone paid nearly ten grand for a road uniform that never saw game action (Gibson, you’ll recall, did not play in the 1988 Series apart from that famous plate appearance).  Of course, I stopped trying to find rationality in the prices people pay for sports memorabilia years ago.

Gibson is pocketing the money for the bat, the helmet and the  jersey.  Proceeds from the trophies are going towards his foundation. The guy who bought the bat can now show it to people who come over for parties and, ten seconds later, after they say wow and give some smiling nods, he can go refill their cocktails and wonder whether he’s getting his $575,000 worth.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.