Dan Uggla running

UPDATE: Marlins “not confident” about signing Dan Uggla, now talking trade


UPDATE: Joe Frisaro of MLB.com reports that the Marlins “are not confident” they will sign Dan Uggla and are now fielding trade offers for the second baseman.

According to Frisaro, in addition to the Tigers, the Marlins have received calls from at least two unidentified National League teams. The Marlins have been asking for relief pitching in return for Uggla, but also remain in the market for a catcher.

If Uggla is traded, the Marlins plan to move Chris Coghlan to second base and give top prospect Matt Dominguez a chance at the starting third base job during spring training. Stay tuned.

Friday, 10:01 PM: So much for optimism. Dan Uggla tells the Associated Press that the Marlins have broken off negotiations for a contract extension.

“It has been the Marlins’ choice to stop negotiations,” he said. “My team is still wanting to negotiate. My career has been in Florida, and I want to stay in Florida.”

On Monday, Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reported that Uggla turned down a four-year, $48 million extension. The slugging second baseman is reportedly holding out for five years, which, frankly, is a lot to give to someone who turns 31 next March and is already known as one of the worst defensive second basemen in the game.

Talks could still re-open at any time, but assuming they don’t, either Uggla will either head back into arbitration for a final time or the Marlins will once again explore a trade.

Should they choose to go the trade route, Rosenthal and Jon Paul Morosi mention tonight that the Tigers have contacted the Marlins to express their interest. According to the report, the Tigers “are looking everywhere for a power bat.” While they prefer someone who bats from the left side of the plate, Uggla is right-handed.

With Carlos Guillen a major question mark after undergoing microfracture surgery on his left knee in September, the Tigers’ current in-house options at second base consist of Will Rhymes and Scott Sizemore, who have a combined 373 plate appearances in the major leagues.

Red Sox sports medicine director says David Ortiz “was essentially playing on stumps”

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 1: David Ortiz #34 of the Boston Red Sox tips his helmet to the crowd as he exits the game after he singled during the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays at Fenway Park on October 1, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)
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David Ortiz had a whale of a final season with the Red Sox. It was so good that he was asked, many, many times, if he was thinking of reversing his retirement decision and coming back for 2017. Ortiz always said no, he was still retiring, occasionally making mention of his aching feet and the physical grind his 40-year-old body was undergoing.

We now know just how much of a grind it was. Indeed, it was extreme. We know this because Dan Dyrek, the Red Sox’ coordinator of sports medicine services, tells it to Rob Bradford of WEEI. Dyrek says that the injuries to Ortiz’s feet, which were often referred to as achilles tendon problems, were way, way more complicated than that, affecting every muscle, bone and tendon in his feet in chain reaction fashion. Dyrek:

“He was essentially playing on stumps. Instead of having this nice, flexible, foot, ankle, calf mechanism to act as a shock absorber, he was playing on stumps. And you can do that for only so long. He was in warrior mode trying to play through this. Once we diagnosed him and saw what was going on and started explaining things to him, there was actually a sense of relief because now he had an explanation of what he was in such excruciating pain.”

That Ortiz was able to even walk through what Dyrek describes is pretty amazing. That he was able to put up a near-MVP season with all of that pain is incredible.

Charlie Sheen would like to throw out the first pitch at a World Series game

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 21:  Actor Charlie Sheen attends Meghan Trainor's performance on NBC's "Today" at Rockefeller Plaza on June 21, 2016 in New York City.  (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
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For all of the ups and downs of his personal and professional life, Charlie Sheen is and always has been a passionate baseball fan. Sheen once bought out an entire section of bleachers for an Angels game so he could catch a home run ball (he didn’t catch a home run ball). He starred in “Eight Men Out” and, more notably, “Major League.” That latter film earned him the love and admiration of Indians fans which lasts to this day.

Indeed, the love continues to be so great that, right after the Indians clinched the American League pennant, they began lobbying for Sheen to throw out the first pitch of a World Series game in Cleveland.  Yesterday afternoon Sheen took to Twitter, posted a pic of his baseball alter ego, and said that, if called upon, he would serve:

While it’s a big broad comedy, the scene in “Major League” in which Sheen comes out of the bullpen to “Wild Thing” blaring and the fans going nuts is legitimately chill-inducing. The fans at Progressive Field are already going to be amped up for the World Series as it is, but imagine how nuts the place would be if they recreated that scene.

Do it, Indians!

UPDATE: Wait, on reflection, don’t do it, Indians. Sheen is sort of a Trumpian figure in that his high profile craziness often causes us to momentarily forget his legitimate badness. We don’t need a guy like that tossing out the first pitch at the World Series.