Cameron Maybin trade a bigger gamble for Marlins than Padres

5 Comments

Constricted by a payroll that’s barely a third of that of division leader Philadelphia, the Florida Marlins should be rolling the dice on high-upside players like Cameron Maybin.  Instead, they chose Saturday to give up on the 23-year-old center fielder, sending him to San Diego for a pair of setup men in Ryan Webb and Edward Mujica.

For as long as he’s been around, Maybin is still a pup, one who has hit .325/.401/.477 in 428 Triple-A at-bats.  He’s a career .306/.393/.478 hitter in the minors.  There’s no doubt he’s struggled in the majors, but some of that may have been the result of the Marlins trying to force him into a top-of-the-order role he still wasn’t ready for.  Maybin hit .257/.323/.391 in 499 at-bats in his three seasons with Florida.  He came in at .234/.302/.361 in 291 at-bats in 2010.

The relievers the Marlins are getting back are hardly worthless.   Webb, 25, has a power sinker that makes him look like a closer on his best days.  He’s my choice to be the team’s best reliever next year.  I’m not so high on Mujica, a modest flyball pitcher who has given up 28 homers in 163 1/3 innings the last two years despite pitching half of his games in Petco Park.  He has terrific control, and he should be a fine innings eater in the middle of the pen.  However, his numbers will likely suffer out of San Diego.

This just seems like a backwards trade.   The team that finished two games out of the postseason last year is the one that should be giving up on a youngster in exchange for solidifying the bullpen.  Instead, that’s what the team that finished 18 games out of first place is attempting to do.

And it’s not as though the Marlins have a replacement for Maybin ready to step in.   The other player they used in center field last year, Cody Ross, was given away to the Giants and apparently did some cool stuff in the postseason.  Emilio Bonifacio could handle the position defensively, but he’s a big liability in anything more than a utility role.  Maybe the Marlins will get a young center fielder back in a Dan Uggla or Ricky Nolasco trade.  Alternatively, they could see what the A’s want for Rajai Davis or Ryan Sweeney.

Maybin’s arrival in San Diego could result in Tony Gwynn Jr.’s exit.  Gwynn is an excellent defender in center field, but he doesn’t really have the bat to be of any real use off the bench.  Maybin will get every chance to start for San Diego, but the club should hang on to Chris Denorfia as a fallback.

The Padres will plug their bullpen holes easily enough, so there isn’t a lot of downside for them here.   With his quality glove and pop at the plate, Maybin remains a great bet to have a decent career as a regular even if he never truly fulfills his potential.   He’s an easy upgrade over Gwynn, and the Padres were able to retain their financial flexibility in getting him.  Score one for GM Jed Hoyer.

Mike Trout has a torn thumb ligament, could require surgery

G
12 Comments

Yesterday Mike Trout left the Marlins-Angels game after hurting his thumb while sliding head first into second base. After the game the Angels talked about it as if it were just a sprain. Trout had an MRI today, however, and the diagnosis is far worse: he has a torn thumb ligament.

While a treatment option has not yet been chosen, surgery is a possibility. A certainty is that he’ll miss, at the very least, several weeks of play. He has been placed on the disabled list for the first time in his career.

Trout, the reigning AL MVP and, without question, the best player in baseball, is batting .337/.461/.742 with 16 home runs, 36 RBI, 36 runs scored, and 10 stolen bases in 206 plate appearances this season. Even with the one of the weaker supporting casts in baseball, Trout had the Angels near .500 and in at least arguable contention in the AL West.

Without him, they are likely sunk. Without him, baseball is worse off.

Basebrawl! Harper, Strickland punch away, Nats-Giants fight

Getty Images
51 Comments

SAN FRANCISCO — Nationals slugger Bryce Harper and San Francisco reliever Hunter Strickland both landed punches to the head during a wild brawl that erupted Monday after a hit by pitch.

Harper was hit in the right hip by Strickland’s 98 mph fastball in the eighth inning with Washington ahead 2-0.

Harper pointed the bat toward Strickland, charged the mound and fired his batting helmet wide of the pitcher. They started to swing away and they each connected as the benches and bullpens emptied.

At least two Giants players forcefully dragged Strickland from the middle of the brawl all the way into the dugout. Harper and Strickland were both ejected.

In the 2014 NL Division Series, Harper hit two home runs off Strickland. After the star’s second shot, in Game 4, he stared at Strickland as he rounded the bases.