The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Baltimore Orioles

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The Best: They’ve stayed quite steady over the course of their 56-year existence, but they’ve changed little details more than you might remember. They’ve switched between various cartoon and various realistic birds a number of times and they’ve messed with the orange/black/white ratio on the hats too. They’ve always looked pretty sharp, though, never running away from the orange the way teams in other sports do from time to time. Of many good looks, I’m going with the cartoon bird-on-the- black-hat-with-orange-bill look they wore from 1966-70.

And let’s not forget the St. Louis Brown portion of their franchise’s history.  They were like a reverse-Yankees or reverse-Red Sox: they had a steady classic look until the late 30s, and then they changed to some weird options. With their obvious use of brown, however, perhaps they can show the Padres the way into a tasteful brown future.

The Worst: The famous all-orange alternates were not a regular look — I believe they only wore them on a handful of occasions — but it wasn’t good.  Like so many other teams, the Orioles looked bad when they chased the black uniform trend as well.

Assessment: They’ve always kept things coherent and have never strayed too far from a core look and color scheme.  And they’ve never done anything truly terrible. The most animated I’ve ever heard an Orioles fan get about their uniforms has involved returning the word “Baltimore” to the front of the roadies, which they did this past season.  As far as uniforms go, the Orioles have always had a handle on things, and that’s pretty admirable.

Dodgers acquire Matt Kemp in five-player trade with Braves

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The Dodgers have pulled off their first blockbuster trade of the offseason, sending Brandon McCarthy, Scott Kazmir, Charlie Culberson, Adrian Gonzalez and cash considerations to the Braves for Matt Kemp, per announcements from both teams. The Braves are set to designate Gonzalez for assignment on Monday, making him a free agent.

Kemp, 33, had a down year with the Braves in 2017, hitting a career-low -0.5 fWAR in 115 games with the club. At the plate, he slashed a modest .276/.318/.463 with 19 home runs and a .781 OPS through 467 plate appearances, but was hampered by a nagging left hamstring strain through most of the season. This will be his 10th campaign with the Dodgers.

Whether or not Kemp can rebound during his second stint in Los Angeles is almost beside the point, however. The deal is effectively a salary dump to end all salary dumps. Offloading multiple one-year contracts for McCarthy, Kazmir and Gonzalez should bring the Dodgers back under the $197 million luxury tax threshold and position them to make a run at some of the big fish in next year’s free agent pool. It’s also worth noting that they may not keep Kemp around for long — per Ken Gurnick of MLB.com, the club appears as likely to flip the veteran outfielder as they are to use him. As for the Braves, they not only rid themselves of the $43 million due Kemp through 2020, but added some rotation and infield depth with McCarthy and Culberson and can now give top prospect Ronald Acuna a legitimate tryout in left field.