The Washington National unveil new jerseys. They’re OK.

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Some people have told me that I should have waited to do my writeup on the Nats’ jerseys until after they unveiled their new duds last night.  I don’t think it makes a difference.  The new outfits are neither the best nor the worst the Nationals have ever sported.  They’re worth discussion, but they don’t change my analysis.

As for that discussion: I like the curly-W on the new home whites well enough. It’s certainly an improvement over the block “Nationals” they’ve been using. It’s being referred to as “an authentic bond with the past,” but the old Senators never put a curly W on the actual jersey. They had block Ws and script “Senators,” but the W’s were always on the caps. I like the look — it’s kind of like the Tigers English D, no? — but I don’t know I can call it my favorite. Give it time, maybe.  I was thinking that a script “Nationals” to track the road grays (which I really like) would be the best move, but what do I know? The W is probably less generic than a simple script would be.  This could grow on me.

The other changes are the red and blue alternates. You know how I feel about solid alternates — batting practice jerseys, blah — and this is no different.  They’ve included a red, white and blue W on the blue alternate which is not my taste, but hey, they’ll probably sell a lot of them. They’re only going to be worn on Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, Sept. 11th and military appreciation days anyway, so it’s not like we’ll see it often.

Other changes: the road cap gets a red bill. Eh, I liked the solid blues, but this isn’t an atrocity. There’s new piping and things too, but I don’t get too animated by that sort of thing unless it’s distracting, which this isn’t.

Ultimately the Nationals are a team still searching for its identity. As far as uniforms go, I suspect they’ll find it in whatever it they happen to be wearing when they win the division the first time.  For now though, I think this looks pretty good. Just wish they’d can the solid alternates.

Sean Manaea has a no-hitter through eight innings

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UPDATE (11:06 PM ET): Manaea is through eight innings of his no-hitter. He caught Rafael Devers looking, then induced a pop-up to retire Sandy Leon and whiffed Jackie Bradley Jr. to end the inning. He’s at 95 pitches and a career-high 10 strikeouts entering the ninth.

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea has no-hit the Red Sox through seven innings of Saturday’s game. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea held the Sox to just three total baserunners through the first seven innings.

Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning, collecting an infield hit for what appeared to be the Red Sox’ first hit of the evening. Upon further review, however, the hit was reversed after Benintendi incurred a batter interference call for running outside the baseline.

Manaea is currently working with a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth. He’s racked up eight strikeouts against 23 batters so far.

If Manaea sees the no-hitter through to completion — as seems entirely possible, given that his pitch count is resting at 84 entering the eighth — he’ll be the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter, meanwhile, was back in 1993 against the Mariners’ Chris Bosio.