The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The San Francisco Giants

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Day three of our sartorial survey takes us to the National League West where we start off with the World Freakin’ Champs.

The Best: In recent years the Giants have kept a classic look. Not always so in the old days.  You know what’s gangsta? Writing “World’s Champions” on your uniforms, that’s what’s gangsta.  If the Giants did that for 2011 I would consider dropping the Braves as my favorite team on the basis of pure awesomeness. They had a lot of different looks in the early day, sometimes with pinstripes, sometimes with red. They first went to the now-classic black and orange in 1933. That didn’t stick immediately — there was more blue and red in their future — but they eventually realized that it was a good look and settled on it for good in 1947.  For the best you can pick basically any year between then and 1976, and from 1994 until the present day.  I’ll go with this as the best anyone has ever looked in a Giants uniform, but really, you can’t go wrong. I dunno, maybe it looked better on Willie McCovey. Longer lines and all of that.

The WorstThey’ve gone to plaid!  And check out the Yankee-envy they were rocking in 1924. Must have worked because the Giants won the pennant that year while the Yankees stayed home, though I wouldn’t call that a great look for what we now know as the Giants.  The late 70s stuff was unfortunate, with the script, black and orange just killing a team that looks best in a timeless ensemble. And that mid-80s-to-1993 look, complete with the bolder, blockier “Giants” on the home jerseys and the interlocking “SF” on the roadies puts me in mind of a 1990s NBA team, and no one in sports looked worse than poorly-dressed 1990s NBA teams.  None of those are the worst though.  These are.  Please banish them now. You looked ridiculous in them, and I don’t care if you think they helped you win it all or not. Go get those plaid jerseys back.

Assessment: I love the cream colored homies. I love the simple lettering.  Orange and black — when used as accent colors only, not the main color — are really nice.  Just a great look overall. Among the best in baseball.  Keep it simple. That is, unless you want to go with “World’s Champions” next season. In which case I’d buy two.

Dodgers activate Adrian Gonzalez

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The Dodgers have reinstated first baseman Adrian Gonzalez from the 60-day disabled list after his recovery from a herniated disc. To make room for him they have optioned Rob Segedin to Triple-A Oklahoma City.

Gonzalez last played on June 11. Since then the Dodgers have gone an astounding 46-9, with shoe-in rookie of the year candidate Cody Bellinger handling first base duties and posting a .978 OPS. When Gonzalez went down he was hitting .255/.304/.339 and only one homer in 49 games.

It’ll be interesting to see what kind of playing time he gets going forward. The Dodgers, of course, have a comfortable lead in the NL West, so they could afford to allow Gonzalez to play a good bit to see if his bat sharpens up while simultaneously giving Bellinger, who has never played more than 137 games in a season, a bit of a breather. Beyond that, though, the Dodgers ain’t broke, so it’s hard to see why anyone would want to tinker with things.

Rays activate Kevin Kiermaier

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The Tampa Bay Rays have activated outfielder Kevin Kiermaier from the 60-day disabled list.

Kiermaier, who fractured his hip in early June, is batting leadoff and playing center field in tonight’s game against the Mariners. He was just 3-for-24 on his rehab assignment, but those aren’t usually predictive of anything. He was hitting .258/.329/.408 when he went down. Getting his bat — and, more importantly, his glove — back in the lineup will boost the struggling Rays in their quest for a playoff spot.