The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The San Diego Padres

11 Comments

The Best: The Padres get a bad rap when it comes to uniform discussions. Why? Because people choose to remember the brown and yellow uniforms as all one, uniformly bad look, when it was anything but. The Padres wore several variations on the theme, ranging from all yellow, to solid brown jerseys, to something in between, both with silly lettering and not-so-silly lettering. There were all kinds of different things going on with those uniforms, but for the most part people think of it as an undifferentiated blob of ugly brown and yellow.

But guess what?  I liked the brown and yellow. And not just in an ironic so-bad-it’s-good way.  They missed with it more often than they hit with it, and maybe it’s too dated a color combination to use now, but there was a sweet spot — I’d say 1976-77 — when it looked pretty good. Change it from a pullover to a button-up number and I’d put the Padres in them right now if I owned the team.

Worst: All yellow was something ugly to behold, be it in their original 1970s form or when used as throwbacks. but at least it had flare. I think the worst was the 1991-2001 pinstripes. Just one of many teams reaching for some classic look that was never theirs and never will be. I don’t count the camouflage jerseys because they’re special occasion only, and they mean well when they wear them (BTW: happy Veterans Day, everyone!).  If I had to pick the worst look, I’d pick the 1984 look, shown here in throwback form, because it’s half-assed.  Either embrace the yellow and brown or don’t, ya know?

Assessment: Brown  looked great on this guyThese guys too.  And given your history . . . it’s your destiny . . .

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

Getty Images
20 Comments

Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.