The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Houston Astros

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The Best: I angered fellow HBTer Drew Silva with my dissing of the Cardinals’ powder blues earlier today.  I have this feeling I’m going to step in it with some Astros fans now too. But here goes:

I know I’m supposed to be all hip and say I liked the crazy 70s-80s getup the best, but despite the fact that I am steeped in irony appreciation, they’re not my favorites. I hate white shoes on baseball players. I don’t like the numbers on the pants. There are all kinds of things wrong with that ensemble separate and apart from the rainbow design. My favorties: the late 60s-early 70s shooting star unis. Those things are just as pleasing as can be. Honorable mention: the Colt .45s gun uniforms. Which, if introduced today, would create a political crisis which would no doubt carry over into presidential campaigns and Supreme Court confirmation hearings. What a drag the modern era is, no?

Worst: Even if the day-glos weren’t as great as everyone now ironically says they were, the 1994-99 overreactions were far worse. Like the Brewers, they looked like a committee put them together. The current ones are better, but not that much better, especially when they wear the brick red batting practice jerseys. Just uninspired and blah. And a Texas team should not wear pinstripes any more than a city slicker should wear a Stetson.

Assessment: Isn’t there a middle ground between gonzo rainbows and corporate calculation?  I’d like to think Houston could find it.  Oh, and one other thing: the best thing ever about those day-glos was the cap with the block H over the star.  That has to return, even in a more muted color scheme.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.