Stan Musial

The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The St. Louis Cardinals

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The Best: The Cards’ uniforms are all about process of elimination: they adopted the two birds on the seesaw look in 1922, and it’s pretty choice. No design before that look or after it without the seesaw (and there were a few before it took firm hold) can qualify as the best.  They switched from white hats to navy hats in 1940 — the red hats we see them in at home now didn’t come into play until 1964 — and the navy hats are pretty sweet themselves.  I kind of like the red-at-home, navy-on-the-road thing. That disappeared after one season, as they abandoned the blue caps in 1965, and didn’t return until 1992.  So, my favorite Cards uniforms have to be either 1964 or 1992-through today. During that latter period they’ve used red shoes on occasion, and I hate those, so some year with the black shoes both at home and on the road have to win. Let’s just call it 1964 to be safe.

The Worst: I have this awesome poster hanging up in my office — and I had it hanging up in my room when I was a kid — with all of the covers of the World Series programs from 1903 through 1981. It was a ballpark giveaway, and it’s really important to me for a lot of reasons. I learned a lot of baseball history just looking at that astonishing old poster, and one of the things I learned was that the Yankees, Dodgers, Giants and Cardinals played in a ton of World Series. Without checking, I believe that they’re the top four pennant winners. Anyway, for this reason, I’ve always had it in my head that they’re the league’s truly classic teams. I know this is subjective, but it’s how it works in my brain.  Of those classic teams the 1970s Cardinals were the only ones who gave in and wore blue roadies.  I know it was the style at the time. I know in some ways the Giants adopted some worse looks (we’ll get to them tomorrow). But seeing the Cardinals in powder blues is just wrong on several levels. It’d be like seeing Humphrey Bogart in a track suit.

Assessment: They’ve ventured into a few more stylistic cul-de-sacs than a lot of the leagues signature franchises, but you really can’t go wrong in a uniform with birds playing seesaw on a baseball bat.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.

Carlos Ruiz leaves a goodbye note for the Phillies

CLEARWATER, FL - FEBRUARY 26:  Carlos Ruiz #51 of the Philadelphia Phillies poses for a portrait on February 26, 2016 at Bright House Field in Clearwater, Florida.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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And then there was one. One player from the 2008 World Series champs, that is. Ryan Howard likely isn’t going anywhere so he’ll be the last one to turn the lights off, but today Carlo Ruiz bid adieu to the Phillies following his trade to Los Angeles.

Lost in all of the emotions the Dodgers are reported to be feeling about A.J. Ellis leaving is the fact that Ruiz was one of the most beloved Phillies players ever, by both his teammates and their fans. Yesterday Roy Halladay penned a heartfelt goodbye to Ruiz, suggesting that he was every bit as essential to his and the Phillies’ success as Ellis has been to Clayton Kershaw (and in pure baseball production, obviously, quite more).

Today Chooch left a message for his now former teammates: