How will the White Sox use Chris Sale next season?

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In September, White Sox general manager Ken Williams stated that 2010 first-round pick Chris Sale would have a chance to win a spot in the starting rotation next spring.

One scenario Williams discussed at the time is that the young left-hander could function as an insurance policy if Jake Peavy needs more time to bounce back from surgery to repair a torn lat muscle. Well, White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper recently told Scott Merkin of MLB.com that he isn’t so sure about that plan.

“If Peavy ain’t ready, I’m not sure the best thing for a young kid is to start for X amount of days and weeks and then move him to the bullpen. It wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world for Sale to be in the bullpen and get more experience and then make him a starter. Years ago, that’s the way a lot of organizations did it.”

Sale, who turns 22 next March, thrived as a reliever after being promoted to the major leagues in August, posting a 1.93 ERA and 32/10 K/BB ratio over 23 1/3 innings. The lanky lefty held the opposition scoreless in 17 out of his 21 appearances.

Both Williams and Cooper see Sale as a starting pitcher in the long-term, but the White Sox potentially have an abundance of riches in their starting rotation next season. If Peavy bounces back from surgery without a hitch — obviously far from a given — the White Sox also have Gavin Floyd, John Danks, Mark Buehrle and Edwin Jackson under team control. Barring injury or a potential trade, it’s hard to see Sale getting a legitimate shot, at least in the short-term.

Merkin believes that Tony Pena is more likely to be a temporary fill-in for the starting rotation. Pena, who is arbitration-eligible this winter, posted a mediocre 5.10 ERA and 56/45 K/BB ratio over 100 2/3 innings this past season. He made three starts down the stretch after Gavin Floyd was shut down due to shoulder tightness.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.